Articles on Winter health

Displaying 1 - 20 of 42 articles

The impact of the flu on a population can be measured by looking at figures including cases, hospitalisations and deaths. From shutterstock.com

It’s a bad year for flu, but it’s too early to call it the worst ever – 5 charts on the 2019 season so far

Headlines about this year's flu season have been alarming. It's true, we are having a serious season – but the data doesn't indicate it's the worst one we've ever had.
You’re not imagining it. Our bodies really do crave macaroni cheese and other comfort foods as the temperature drops. Here’s why. from www.shutterstock.com

Health Check: why do we crave comfort food in winter?

Research into our brain, gut and childhood memories tells us why we reach for macaroni cheese rather than salad in winter.
What goes up must come down, and that includes the protection the flu vaccine offers against influenza. Irina Bg/Shutterstock

When’s the best time to get your flu shot?

Protection wanes after four or five months, so for most people, it makes sense to get a flu shot in mid to late May or early June so you're protected when the flu season peaks in August or September.
Vaccines for the flu offer mediocre coverage compared with those for other diseases. PLRANG ART/Shutterstock

Here’s why the 2017 flu season was so bad

A better vaccine could have reduced the rates of flu, but not the high-dose Fluzone vaccine doctors were touting at the start of the week.
More people end up in hospital from cold than flu. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Health Check: what is the common cold and how do we get it?

The “common cold” is common, most of us will have at least one or two per year. Despite this, there's a lack of good research looking into it, and ways to prevent and treat it.
People aren’t productive at work when they’re ill and they risk infecting others. William Brawley/Flickr

Health Check: I feel a bit sick, should I stay home or go to work?

You wake up and feel under the weather. If you're vomiting or have a fever, the decision to stay at home is probably clear cut. But what if you generally feel unwell but are torn about missing work?

Top contributors

More