Artikel-artikel mengenai Aboriginal history

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Mungo Man finally returns to where he was found in the Mungo National Park. Office of Environment and Heritage/J Spencer

Mungo Man returns home: there is still much he can teach us about ancient Australia

The remains of the first known Australian, Mungo Man, begin their journey home today. Scientists hope they'll still get a chance to study the ancient remains, working with the Traditional Owners.
Heaven only knows what sort of excursion Wooredy and Truganini thought they had embarked upon on when G.A. Robinson took them to Recherche Bay in 1830 to make an overland trek to the Tasmanian west coast. Cassandra Pybus

Friday essay: journey through the apocalypse

Wooredy and his second wife Truganini set off into the Tasmanian wilderness with settler George Robinson in 1830, on a "conciliatory" mission to find other original Tasmanians. Their stories bear witness to a psychological and cultural transition without parallel in modern colonialism.
George Hamilton, Meeting natives on the Campaspi plains, Victoria, June 1836. National Library of Australia

Noble horses and ‘black monsters’: the politics of colonial compassion

George Hamilton published An Appeal for the Horse in 1866, a defence of animal welfare well ahead of its time. However, his compassion for Aboriginal people was conspicuously lacking.
The Dove ad published on Facebook, which the company took down after many complaints of racial insensitivity. NayTheMUA/Facebook

Dove, real beauty and the racist history of skin whitening

Beauty brand Dove caused controversy with an ad seemingly showing a black woman turning white after using its body lotion. While Dove removed the ad, it played into the racist history of skin whitening.
Aboriginal dancers from Pinjarra perform at the unveiling of the counter-memorial in Esplanade Park, Fremantle, April 9 1994. Courtesy Bruce Scates

Monumental errors: how Australia can fix its racist colonial statues

A Fremantle monument to three white explorers was revised in 1994 to acknowledge the violence committed against Indigenous owners. As Australia struggles to reconcile its racist past, perhaps this monument shows a way forward.
The Madjedbebe excavation in the Northern Territory. Dominic O Brien/Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation

Buried tools and pigments tell a new history of humans in Australia for 65,000 years

A new study pushes back the first known evidence of human activity in Australia – to 65,000 years ago.
Brenda L. Croft. shut/mouth/scream (detail) 2016 Courtesy of the artist and Stills Gallery

Defying Empire: the legacy of 1967

The National Gallery of Australia's Third National Indigenous Art Triennial presents a passionate well-considered argument for an enduring Aboriginal culture.
On expedition with Norman Tindale and local Aboriginal group at a rock shelter at Bathurst Head (Thartali) in eastern Cape York Peninsula, 1927. Photo by Herbert Hale/South Australian Museum, Archives Norman Tindale Collection (AA 338/5/4/41)

DNA reveals Aboriginal people had a long and settled connection to country

Aboriginal people stayed settled in places across Australia for 50,000 years until Europeans arrived, showing a strong connection with the land.
A fruit cart depicting a ‘picanniny’ child: such figures were popular at a time when Aboriginal children were being removed from their families. Author provided

Friday essay: the politics of Aboriginal kitsch

What are we to make of 'Aboriginalia': bric-a-brac, tiles, ornaments and artworks - once hugely popular - depicting caricatures of Indigenous people? What if they are collected now in a knowing, ironic way?
A light graffiti image of Ms Dhu is projected on a building in Perth. Ethan Blue

Seeing Ms Dhu: how photographs argue for human rights

Noel Pearson has accused the ABC of racism in dwelling on indigenous alienation. But many advances in the status of Aboriginal Australians have been prompted by revealing ill-treatment, which is why Ms Dhu's family want footage of her last hours made public.
The Warratyi rock shelter is elevated above a local stream catchment in South Australia. Giles Hamm

The evidence of early human life in Australia’s arid interior

Archaeologists found thousands of objects in a remote Australian cave which shows Aborigines made it inland some 10,000 years earlier than first thought. So what did they find?
The facilities were poor and some inmates were subjected to unsuccessful experimentation with a “vaccine” that used arsenic compounds. Hospital Ward Dorre Island/State library of Western Australia

What do the newspapers really tell us about the lock hospital histories?

The lock hospitals inflicted incalculable traumas on Aboriginal people, wrenching them away from families and country.
Professor Eske Willerslev talks to Aboriginal elders in the Kalgoorlie area in southwestern Australia. Preben Hjort, Mayday Film

DNA reveals a new history of the First Australians

New DNA research working with Indigenous Australians is answering many of the questions about when and where the First Australians emerged many thousands of years ago.
The evidence shows counting was beyond more than a handful of numbers for Australia’s Indigenous people. Shutterstock/Sam DCruz

Why old theories on Indigenous counting just won’t go away

There is plenty of evidence to show Australia's Indigenous people had ways of counting big numbers, yet the myth persists they couldn't count more than a handful of things. Why?

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