Artikel-artikel mengenai Affordable Care Act

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From left, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., hold a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

How the latest effort to repeal Obamacare would affect millions

A Senate vote in July seemed to signal the end of efforts to kill the Affordable Care Act. With a Sept. 30 deadline looming, though, a new bill has real possibilities. Here's why that could be bad.
States like Ohio could lose billions of dollars in federal funds if the ACA is repealed. AP Photo/Tony Dejak

State budgets hang in the balance as future of ACA uncertain

As states begin to plan budgets, the future of Obamacare is still undecided. A former Ohio state senator explains how budget directors are bracing for billions of dollars in shortfalls.
The cells inside this bioreactor are the real pharmaceutical factories. Sanofi Pasteur

Biologics: The pricey drugs transforming medicine

Rather than being designed by chemists, this class of pharmaceuticals is produced by living cells. Here's where they come from and how they work.
North Carolina NAACP President Rev. William Barber, accompanied by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas, left, as activists, many with the clergy, are taken into custody by U.S. Capitol Police on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 13, 2017, after protesting against the Republican health care bill. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Why health savings accounts are a bust for the poor but a boost for the privileged

The latest Senate health care bill is still a hodgepodge of efforts to repeal Obamacare, critics say. One of their concerns is the focus on HSAs.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, shown here in June, 2017, is the architect of the new version of the Senate health care bill released today. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

The 5 faulty beliefs that have led to Republican dysfunction on health care

Republicans have had a hard time dismantling the Affordable Care Act, despite their promises. That could be because they are operating under certain beliefs about health care that are not accurate.
Decreased regulation has failed to reduce the growing administrative burden of health care. Valeri Potapova/Shutterstock.com

Why market competition has not brought down health care costs

GOP lawmakers say their bills to replace the Affordable Care Act would do a better job than the ACA of controlling rising health care costs, but 40 years of deregulation show it just won't work.
A woman speaks up at a town hall gathering with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina) in March 2017. Mark Crammer/AP

How bills to replace Obamacare would especially harm women

Almost nine million women gained insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act. Here's why women could be set back by Republican bills to undo the ACA.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who announced June 27 that a vote on the Senate health care bill has been delayed until after the July 4 recess. Carolyn Kaster/AP

Republican health care bills defy the party’s own ideology

The health care bill proposed by Senate Republicans was little better than the House version, which begs an important question: Who's driving health care law – a free market or insurance companies?
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) smiles after he unveiled the Senate health care bill on June 22, 2017. Scott Applewhite/AP

How to make sense of the Senate health care bill: 4 essential reads

The Senate released its new health care bill on June 22, 2017, and it differs slightly from a bill passed by the House in May. Read what our experts have written in recent months about key pieces.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other Republican leaders at the Capitol on June 6, 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP

How Obamacare may morph into Medicaid

Senate Republicans have been trying to find a way to get enough votes to repeal Obamacare. Here's how their delay could lead to a result they did not expect – more Medicaid.
President Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan after the House passed a bill to repeal Obamacare and cut back Medicaid funding. Evan Vucci

Why America needs a ‘do-over’ on Medicaid reform

The health care bill recently passed by the House imposes big cuts to the underfunded Medicaid program. A new approach is needed, starting with the best ideas of both parties.
Rep. Billy Long (R-Mo.) speaks to reporters outside the White House on May 3, 2017 after a meeting with the president on proposed legislation that could limit coverage for preexisting conditions. Susan Walsh/AP

How pre-existing conditions became front and center in health care vote

How preexisting conditions came to be a condition for passage of the Republicans' health care law is a complicated tale. Insurers created the cost-saving technique, excluding millions over the years.
Two swing votes: Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) and Rep. Greg Waldon (R-Ore.), after striking a deal with Pres. Trump on the heath care bill. Susan Walsh/AP Photo

How did health insurance get so complicated? Here are some answers

Even Pres. Trump said he had no idea that health insurance can be so complicated. Part of the reason is that it's not something we really want to buy – and not something we want to buy for others.
An empty wheelchair – or is there a person there we do not see? From www.shutterstock.com

The patients we do not see

For many of the nation's poor, food and shelter are more important than health care. Questions of insurance coverage loom broadly, but another question lingers: how to treat the poor we do not see.
House Speaker Paul Ryan announced March 24 that he was pulling his proposed health care bill from consideration. Scott Applewhite/AP

Did medical Darwinism doom the GOP health plan?

The U.S. has been arguing about health care for decades. Critics have argued that insurance for all is a sign of weakness or even Communist. Here's a look at how the thinking has evolved -- or not.

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