Artikel-artikel mengenai African Americans

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Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris are among the 2020 presidential hopefuls in favor of reparations. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Reparations are essential to eliminating the substantial wealth gap between black and white Americans

Several presidential hopefuls have offered proposals to close the racial wealth gap, from baby bonds to reparations. A simulation suggests policies short of direct aid to blacks won't do the trick.
Law enforcement officers walking to the scene of a shooting at a shopping mall in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019. AP/Rudy Gutierrez

From across the globe to El Paso, changes in the language of the far-right explain its current violence

Major changes in the language of white supremacists have happened in the last decade that provide a window into how the groups mobilize support, shape political perceptions and advance their cause.
Activists rallied in New York City in July 2016 to protest police-involved shootings. a katz/Shutterstock.com

Police are more likely to kill men and women of color

According to a new study, about 52 of every 100,000 men and boys, and about 3 of every 100,000 women and girls, are killed by police in the US.
Carvings and barbed wire illustrate the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial on Bainbridge Island, Wash. The site, designed by architect Johnpaul Jones, opened in 2011. (AP/Seattle Times/Jordan Stead)

Why Japanese-Americans received reparations and African-Americans are still waiting

Social movement theory helps to explain why Japanese-Americans received reparations but the same will be much more challenging to provide for African-Americans.
Left: Robert Smith. Right (clockwise from left): Beyonce Knowles-Carter, Jay-Z, LeBron James and Nicki Minaj. Reuters, USA Today

Could black philanthropy help solve the black student debt crisis?

A recent gift by billionaire Robert Smith to pay off the student loans of 2019 graduates of Morehouse points to the potential of America's black elite to pay off all black students' college loans.
When a group of white and African American integrationists entered a St. Augustine, Fla. segregated hotel pool in 1964, the hotel manager poured acid into it. AP Photo

The forgotten history of segregated swimming pools and amusement parks

Municipal swimming pools flourished in the 20th century. But too often, their success was based on the exclusion of African Americans.
More than 40 lynchings have been documented in Maryland. Shutterstock

Maryland has created a truth commission on lynchings – can it deliver?

The first truth commission to research lynchings has been established in Maryland. It has the potential to educate the public about and support racial reconciliation. But it also faces obstacles.
On Aug. 28, 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., addresses marchers during his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. AP/File

J. Edgar Hoover’s revenge: Information the FBI once hoped could destroy Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has been declassified

Publication was justified of information from the FBI that Martin Luther King Jr. witnessed and celebrated a woman’s rape, writes a historian, who warns the FBI had long wanted to destroy King.
Octavia Spencer is one of the few black women to have a lead role in a horror film. Universal Pictures/YouTube

We’re in a golden age of black horror films

For decades, black characters in horror movies were objects of ridicule, died first or played evil Voodoo practitioners. But now we're seeing a wave of films created by blacks and starring blacks.
The recent maternal health crisis of tennis player Serena Williams was a flash point for many health professionals. A photo of Williams with her daughter from her Instagram account. Instagram/SerenaWilliams

9 ways racism impacts maternal health

As we celebrate moms this Mother’s Day, let's remember that maternal health is a right that many do not enjoy.
Duke Ellington leads his orchestra in a rehearsal in Coventry, England, on Dec. 2, 1966. Associated Press

Duke Ellington’s melodies carried his message of social justice

From spirituals about the trials of slavery to the fight for civil rights and the modern rhythms of swing music, Duke Ellington told a story about black life that was both beautiful and complex.
Jessie Dean Gipson Simmons, shown top center about age 37, c. 1961. [Clockwise: daughter Angela, sons Obadiah Jerone, Jr. and Carl, and husband Obadiah Jerone, Sr.; daughters Carolyn and Quendelyn are not pictured] Simmons family archives

Jessie Simmons: How a schoolteacher became an unsung hero of the civil rights movement

When Jessie Simmons applied for a teaching job in 1958, her application went to a separate file for "Negro teachers" and got rejected. An education scholar recounts how Simmons fought back and won.

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