Artikel-artikel mengenai Carbon tax

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The biggest U.S. oil company wants to pay every American a dividend. AP Photo/Richard Drew

Taxing carbon may sound like a good idea but does it work?

Exxon Mobil has a clear motive to back a new plan to tax carbon with its clout and money. And a carbon tax that is high enough to work might prove politically impossible to enact.
Coldwater Indian band Chief Lee Spahan raises an eagle feather after responding to a Federal Court of Appeal ruling that put the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion on hold.

Trans Mountain ruling: Victory for environmentalists, but a setback for action on climate change

Environmentalists claimed victory when a court ruling put the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on hold. But delaying or cancelling the project would also impact Canada's climate change strategy.
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and federal energy minister Josh Frydenberg have been forced to back down on plans to legislate emissions reductions for the electricity sector. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

The too hard basket: a short history of Australia’s aborted climate policies

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has abandoned the emissions-reduction component of his signature energy policy, in the latest chapter of a brutal decade-long saga for Australian climate policy.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford, seen here walking on the front lawn of the Ontario Legislature in June, is vowing to deliver on his campaign promise to scrap the “disastrous” cap-and-trade system and fight a federal carbon tax. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Taxpayers will back a carbon tax if they get a cheque in the mail

Ontario and Saskatchewan are vociferously fighting the federal government's carbon tax efforts. But rather than back down, Ottawa should embrace a simple, fair and transparent “carbon dividend.”
No about-face: Barnaby Joyce (left) may have gone to the backbench, but his successor Michael McCormack looks set to keep his climate views aflame. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

The Nationals have changed their leader but kept the same climate story

Barnaby Joyce had a long history of opposing climate action. His successor Michael McCormack seems to think the same way, despite climate being a growing threat to the Nationals' rural voters.
The Keating cabinet in 1995, featuring John Faulkner (back row, centre), whose vision for a carbon price was thwarted. AAP Image/National Archives of Australia

Cabinet papers 1994-95: Keating’s climate policy grapples sound eerily familiar

Paul Keating's government, faced with the prospect of international action on climate change, took steps to preserve the coal industry - a tactic that has been rebooted many times since.
A polar bear walks over sea ice floating in the Victoria Strait in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in July 2017. Research suggests that divesting in fossil fuels could help nations meet their climate change goals. (AP Photo/David Goldman, file)

How divesting of fossil fuels could help save the planet

Fossil fuel divestment apparently works. Research suggests announcements of divestments have a significant impact on the fossil fuel industry's share prices.
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull still can’t seem to distance himself from coal. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Coal and the Coalition: the policy knot that still won’t untie

The Turnbull government is still tying itself in knots over the future of coal, as literally decades of policy turmoil on climate and energy continue to roll on.
Past and present: Bob Brown (centre) pictured in 2010 with Greens colleagues including current leader Richard Di Natale (right). AAP Image/Alan Porritt

The Australian Greens at 25: fighting the same battles but still no breakthrough

The environmental issues we face are ideal recruiting for green parties, but the breakthroughs aren't happening, and after 25 years as a federal party the Greens are still fighting on the same fronts.
Future food will shift to alternative proteins such as insects, like this 3D-printed biscuit made of insect flour by designer Penelope Kupfer. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Bugging out: How we’ll feed ourselves in 2167

Climate change, insects and urban farm towers are a few things that will change how and what we eat in the future.

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