Artikel-artikel mengenai Fake news

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Through their commitments to, and dependence on, professional education and multidisciplinary research, universities have skin in the epistemic game. Shutterstock

Universities should take stronger leadership on knowledge and how it matters

It’s time to (do more than) talk about knowledge. Universities must take leadership in helping develop students capacity to recognise different kinds of knowledge and work flexibly.
The largest television company in the US recently issued a coordinated campaign of scripted warnings about fake news. Screen Shot at 2PM

Outlawing fake news will chill the real news

The fake news label has been used by politicians to discredit unfavourable media stories. But even assuming good intentions, new laws are incapable of tackling the menace.
We don’t automatically question information we read or hear. Gaelfphoto/Shutterstock.com

Why you stink at fact-checking

Cognitive psychologists know the way our minds work means we not only don't notice errors and misinformation we know are wrong, we also then remember them as true.
Trolls spread Russian disinformation campaigns across Europe and the U.S. Shutterstock

Busting Russia’s fake news the European Union way

The Europeans have something to teach the US about protecting citizens subject to Russian internet propaganda. Their effort isn't just a different form of propaganda. It's more like fact-checking.
What these people are seeing isn’t real – but they might think it is. AP Photo/Francisco Seco

Think Facebook can manipulate you? Look out for virtual reality

As the internet-connected world reels from revelations about personalized manipulation based on Facebook data, a scholar of virtual reality warns there's an even bigger crisis of trust on the horizon.
There are widespread fears that so-called echo chambers and filter bubbles are leading to political polarization that poses a danger to democracy. But are the fears unfounded? (Melvin Sokolsky/1963 via Creative Commons)

The myth of the echo chamber

Despite fears that so-called echo chambers are causing political polarization, a new study suggests it's not the case.
Even common knowledge isn’t immune. ledokolua/Shutterstock.com

Writing’s power to deceive

Reading something that sows doubt about a widely agreed-upon fact – even the election of George Washington as president – can have a profound effect.
The stunning hoax of The Shed at Dulwich, deceived millions and showed how willing we are to consume an appetizing story. (Courtesy VICE /Theo McInnes)

Believe nothing: The hoax of the Shed at Dulwich

The Shed at Dulwich reached TripAdvisor's No. 1 spot for restaurants in London before it was revealed to be a hoax. The stunt showed how easily we are fooled. The lesson learned? Trust no one.
An 1894 cartoon by Frederick Burr Opper criticizes American newspapers’ elasticity with the truth. Library of Congress

A century ago, progressives were the ones shouting ‘fake news’

The practice of calling attention to false stories – with actual fakers then levying the charge on their accusers – dates back to battles between progressive reformers and corporate media outlets.

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