Artikel-artikel mengenai Heart disease

Menampilkan 1 - 20 dari 160 artikel

Women who have had a heart attack are less likely to be given an angiogram (a special X-ray to detect blockages of the heart), rehabilitation, or medication than men. Shutterstock/Syda Productions

Women who have heart attacks receive poorer care than men

New research shows women receive sub-optimal care after they have a heart attack and are twice as likely than men to die six months after the attack.
An accurate reading is essential to detect high blood pressure. This photo shows optimal procedures, including the supported arm, no clothing on the arm and uncrossed legs. The American Heart Association.

The latest blood pressure guidelines: What they mean for you

New guidelines for high blood pressure lower the numbers to define and diagnose high blood pressure. Here are some things you need to know, including how to make sure you get an accurate reading.
Only around half of at-risk Indigenous Australians are taking preventative medication for heart disease. from www.shutterstock.com

Getting a heart check early can prevent heart attack and stroke in Indigenous Australians

A new study has found too few Indigenous people are getting health checks, despite their elevated risk of heart problems.
Sitting can do more than give you a headache. It is linked to diabetes and obesity. Stockfour/Shutterstock.com

Sitting and diabetes in older adults: Does timing matter?

Researchers are learning even more about how a sedentary lifestyle is bad for our bodies. A recent study shows a link between sitting patterns and diabetes in older people.
Millions more Australians will be diagnosed with having high blood pressure if the recommendations are followed. www.shutterstock.com

New blood pressure guidelines may make millions anxious that they’re at risk of heart disease

Previously, a person would be diagnosed with high blood pressure if their systolic reading was 140mmHg. But it's recommended this threshold be lowered to 130mmHg, which will do more harm than good.
Taxing sugar places the burden on the poor – people who are already burdened by higher rates of heart disease, obesity and diabetes. (Shutterstock)

How sugar taxes punish the people

Sugar taxes fail to tackle the root of the problem -- the production and marketing of foods that cause chronic disease.
Most Canadians eat at least double the daily adequate intake of sodium. And, shockingly, 93 per cent of children aged four to eight exceed Health Canada’s Tolerable Upper Intake Level. (Shutterstock)

Dietary salt, the silent killer: How much is too much?

Most men, women and children in Canada exceed the tolerable upper limits of salt for their bodies. Consumers need to understand how much salt is too much -- to avoid hypertension and heart disease.
Many people aren’t aware of the long-term risks alcohol poses to health. Adam Jaime/Unsplash

Four ways alcohol is bad for your health

The growing list of alcohol-related diseases includes bowel cancers, mouth and oesophageal cancers, breast cancers, heart disease, respiratory infections and mental health problems.
College is a fun time for young adults, but it can also become an unhealthy time. oneinchpunch/Shutterstock.com

College students may not be as heart-healthy as they think

College students may think they are living a fit life, but a recent study adds to growing research that suggests that many students are developing risk factors for heart disease.
Governments in countries such as Mexico and the United Kingdom have responded to the over-consumption of refined sugar with a “sugar tax;” Canada lags behind. (Unsplash/Neven Krcmarek)

Just how bad is all that sugar for your heart?

Too much refined sugar in your diet is not just a risk factor for obesity and diabetes, it also increases your chances of heart disease.

Kontributor teratas

Lebih banyak