Artikel-artikel mengenai Heart disease

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Heart attacks increase with lower air temperature, lower atmospheric air pressure, higher wind velocity, shorter sunshine duration and colder weather. from shutterstock.com

Heart attacks more frequent in colder weather

Doctors have long acknowledged heart attacks are more likely to occur in cold weather. But now a major study has confirmed it.
A nurse in Uganda uses a stethoscope to listen for heart problems at a screening and educational event Oct. 31, 2017. Tao Farren-Hefer

Women with heart disease in sub-Saharan Africa face challenges, but stigma may be worst of all

Noncommunicable diseases are a growing problem in Africa. Among women, heart disease is a particular concern. Medication to treat it can interfere with pregnancy, making women undesirable partners.
For decades, doctors have been prescribing low-dose aspirin for healthy people over the age of 70. from shutterstock.com

Daily low-dose aspirin doesn’t reduce heart-attack risk in healthy people

Taking low-dose aspirin daily doesn't delay the onset of disability in healthy older people. Nor does it prevent heart attack or stroke in those who hadn't experienced either condition before.
Women who have had a heart attack are less likely to be given an angiogram (a special X-ray to detect blockages of the heart), rehabilitation, or medication than men. Shutterstock/Syda Productions

Women who have heart attacks receive poorer care than men

New research shows women receive sub-optimal care after they have a heart attack and are twice as likely than men to die six months after the attack.
An accurate reading is essential to detect high blood pressure. This photo shows optimal procedures, including the supported arm, no clothing on the arm and uncrossed legs. The American Heart Association.

The latest blood pressure guidelines: What they mean for you

New guidelines for high blood pressure lower the numbers to define and diagnose high blood pressure. Here are some things you need to know, including how to make sure you get an accurate reading.
Only around half of at-risk Indigenous Australians are taking preventative medication for heart disease. from www.shutterstock.com

Getting a heart check early can prevent heart attack and stroke in Indigenous Australians

A new study has found too few Indigenous people are getting health checks, despite their elevated risk of heart problems.

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