Artikel-artikel mengenai Indigenous

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In this July 2011 photo, an Inuit fisherman pulls in a fish on a sea filled with floating ice. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

The future of food is ready for harvest

A recent summit in Ottawa on what's known as agroecology has shown that more equitable and sustainable methods of producing food are not only possible, they're beginning to spread around the world.
People buy fruits and vegetables in May 2017 at the Jean-Talon farmers market in Montreal. (Shutterstock)

A Canadian food policy moves closer to becoming a reality

A government report on an upcoming national food policy is an optimistic indication that it will result in both healthier and more sustainable food for Canadians and stronger agri-food industry.
Constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians has stalled. It’s time to take a new approach. Alan Porritt/AAP

A new way to recognise an Indigenous nation in Australia

A federal system could deliver on three of the four key elements of the Uluru Statement. Plus, all the elements already exist or are in the works in Australia.
A line of protesters against the construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota head to a unity rally on the west steps of the State Capitol in September 2016 in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Protecting heritage is a human right

Development projects are claiming ancestral sites at alarming rates. This ineffective protection of Indigenous heritage is a violation of human rights.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks at a news conference in Ottawa in June 2018. A United Nations housing watchdog has criticized the Liberals over what it sees as their about-face on a promise to put a human rights lens on its housing strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Canada’s complicated relationship with international human rights law

If the liberal international order is to survive, countries like Canada will need to defend international human rights law.
A statue of John A. Macdonald in Montreal has been repeatedly vandalized with red paint to symbolize blood. As the debate continues about removing statues, what specific actions are needed to promote reconciliation? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Reconciliation requires more than symbolic gestures

Removing statues of historical figures may be important symbolic statements when it comes to reconciliation, but action on important Indigenous issues like land claims and education are needed more.
Four hikers walk west, from the village of Val Marie in southern Saskatchewan, along a historical trail once used by Indigenous tribes and settlers. Giving Canadians the ‘right to roam’ might be a small step toward answering the calls of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. James R. Page

Why Canadians need ‘the right to roam’

A right-to-roam movement has never developed in Canada the way it has in the U.K. Here's how it could benefit Canadian society as a whole, including reconciliation efforts with the Indigenous.
In 2016, the Ontario government promised the province’s schools would teach all students about residential schools and add more Indigenous perspectives into the provincial curriculum. The newly elected Conservative government has scrapped those plans. Library and Archives Canada

Nixing plans to add Indigenous content to Ontario curriculum is a travesty

Ontario's move to ignore the calls of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to add Indigenous content to its history and social studies curriculum is foolish and dangerous.
A scene from the best-selling ‘Red: A Haida Manga,’ a revenge story. Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas

Haida manga: An artist embraces tragedy, beautifully

The "Haida manga" by Indigenous artist Yahgulanaas opens a graphic dialogue between the different cultures of the Pacific Northwest and East Asia.
Activists protest in Barcelona, Spain on June 21, 2018. A Spanish court triggered a new wave of outrage by granting bail to five men acquitted of gang rape and convicted instead on a lesser felony of sexual abuse, a case that has shocked Spain. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Rethinking the penalties for rape

Germaine Greer's recent comments about the punishments for rape show the need for more complex, evidence-based discussions about trauma and the criminal justice system.
Hamilton resident, Peter Khill, 28, admitted he shot Jon Styres but said he fired in self-defence, believing Styres was about to shoot him. A jury acquitted him last week. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel

Erasing race but not racism in the Peter Khill trial

A jury found Peter Khill not guilty of second-degree murder of Jonathan Styres, an Indigenous father of two. Questions about jury selection and the justice system are raised by one of the jury triers.
Math Catcher volunteer, Janelle Dobson-Kocsis from the Kwanlin Dun Band, works with a student to build an object called “tensegrity.” This is one of Math Cather’s hands-on activities developed by volunteer and former PhD student, Alejandro Erickson. Math Catcher Program

Mathematics talent abounds in Indigenous communities

The Math Catcher Program aims to encourage youth - with an emphasis on Indigenous students - to consider mathematics as a field of study but also to have them appreciate mathematics in everyday life.
Designs by Jeneen Frei Njootli on the runway at the Frost Moon Showcase at Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto last weekend. (Red Works Photography)

Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto is healing and resurgence in action

The organizers of Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto gathered a group of designers and creative thinkers to present and discuss the future of Indigenous fashion last week.
With the legalization of cannabis in Canada just around the corner, there’s still too much panic over drug education. There’s no need to rush awareness campaigns in advance of legalization; it’s better to start doing them right. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Why we need better, smarter, panic-free education on cannabis

When it comes to cannabis legalization, we don’t need more education, we need to do education better.
A Simon Fraser University student wears a First Nations Coast Salish woven cedar hat as she and other students wait to receive their degrees during the fall convocation ceremony at the university in Burnaby, B.C., on October 11, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Why there are so few Indigenous graduates at convocation

Wilful under-funding of Indigenous education is producing an Indigenous underclass.

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