Artikel-artikel mengenai Indigenous health

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People with disability living in remote communities may receive money for supports, but that doesn’t mean there’s anywhere to purchase them. from shutterstock.com

Indigenous people with disability have a double disadvantage and the NDIS can’t handle that

The NDIS has good intentions, but its design doesn't seem to support the unique needs of Indigenous people living with a disability, particularly if they're living in remote communities.
Balgo artists: Miriam Baadjo (b. 1957),Tossie Baadjo (b. 1958), Jane Gimme (b. 1958), Gracie Mosquito (b. 1955), Helen Nagomara (b. 1953), Ann Frances Nowee (b. 1964) and Imelda Yukenbarri (b. 1954). Bush medicine: a collaborative work by women from Wirrimanu (Balgo), 2018, acrylic on linen, 120×180cm, MHM2018.32, © Warlayirti Artists; Medical History Museum

The art of healing: five medicinal plants used by Aboriginal Australians

At least half the food eaten by the first Australians came from plants. And in terms of medicines, many different parts of plants were used.
It isn’t helpful to jump to conclusions about child sexual abuse. Raj Rabidas/Shutterstock

An STI epidemic in young people does not signal sexual abuse

Young people in remote Aboriginal communities have high rates of STIs for a number of reasons, including inconsistent condom use and poor access to health services.
If youths with brain impairment had been identified and supported early, their entry into the justice system could have been avoided entirely. from shutterstock.com

Almost every young person in WA detention has a severe brain impairment

New research assessing young people in WA detention found 89% were severely impaired in at least one area of brain function. One in three had fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).
While death rates from heart and kidney disease have dropped among Indigenous people, death rates from cancer are on the rise. from shutterstock.com

To close the health gap, we need programs that work. Here are three of them

Politicians make sweeping statements on how to close the gap. But here's advice from people working directly with Indigenous communities who have evidence for what actually works.
Members of the James Bay Cree gather around the fire as part of a week-long celebration called ‘wellness week,’ aimed at improving personal health and wellness in their community in northern Québec. (David DyckFehderau)

Indigenous group tackles diabetes with storytelling

Like many Indigenous groups around the world, the James Bay Cree of northern Québec have a disproportionately high rate of diabetes. They’re facing it down with a decidedly Indigenous solution.
Impetigo happens when itching causes the skin to break and let in disease-causing bacteria. from shutterstock.com

Why simple school sores often lead to heart and kidney disease in Indigenous children

While school sores – or impetigo – is a treatable condition, if left untreated it can lead to much more serious illness such as kidney and heart disease.
Indigenous schoolchildren dance during a launch of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan in Brisbane. AAP

Radical rethink of Closing the Gap required, despite some progress

The latest census data reveals valuable insights into Closing the Gap targets. While there's some improvement in school attendance rates, all other indicators suggest a radical rethink is required.
An infection prevention and control professional wipes her gloves with a bleach wipe during an ebola virus training in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Explainer: How we all benefit from the public health system

Infectious diseases pose a continual threat to Canadians. Ensuring the population stays healthy requires increasing investment in our public health system.
“Looking for one girl to share a master room with another 3 girls.” Screenshot from Gumtree ad, August 19 2017, 11:58

Room sharing is the new flat sharing

City living costs are driving people to organise themselves to share a room with strangers. These precarious living arrangements hardly qualify as a home.
Strongyloides can affect anyone but is most prevalent in areas of economic disadvantage. LUCY HUGHES JONES/AAP

Strongyloidiasis is a deadly worm infecting many Australians, yet hardly anybody has heard of it

Up to 60% of people in some Indigenous Australian communities are infected with a parasitic worm that almost nobody has heard of, and without treatment, the infection can be fatal.
Indigenous research participants described a connection to the land as fundamental to their physical, social, psychological and spiritual health.

Back to the land: How one Indigenous community is beating the odds

One First Nations community stands out in northern Ontario, for its low rates of suicide and other mental health challenges. The residents say it's all about their connection to the land.

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