Artikel-artikel mengenai Indigenous youth

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Over the past five years, one in every four children who died by suicide in Australia was Indigenous. Shutterstock

Why are we losing so many Indigenous children to suicide?

Poverty and social exclusion play a big role in Indigenous child suicide. The causes are complex but we know enough to act now to reduce the number of deaths in our communities.
Indigenous youth planning on attending post-secondary education would benefit from appropriate financial literacy information. Here students Cheyenne Wilson, 13, Roy Joseph, 13, centre, and Connor Roberts, 13, after attending a presentation by B.C.‘s representative for Children and Youth at Shoreline Community School in Victoria, B.C., on May 15, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Financial empowerment is the road to success for Indigenous youth

Indigenous entrepreneurship is growing at a rate six times faster than the general Canadian population and it is 10 years younger. Culturally relevant financial literacy is critical to its success.
An engraving of Dirimera and Conaci by Giuseppe Mochetti taken from a daguerreotype of April 5 1852. Acc no 77930P . With acknowledgements to the Archives of the Benedictine Community of New Norcia.

‘You don’t belong to my country either.’ How two Noongar boys spoke up, a world away from home

Aboriginal children are rarely named in the colonial archive. But the remarkable story of Dirimera and Conaci reveals two boys who, while removed from their land, had a keen sense of sovereignty.
All Australian schools should provide high-quality education to all Australian students, including Indigenous ones. Shutterstock

How flexischools could help close the gap in Indigenous education

Flexischools appear to be doing Indigenous education better than mainstream schooling. To close the gap in education, we should look at what these schools are doing and apply it in the mainstream.
Indigenous, LGBT, Black and refugee youth are among the groups that are at a greater risk of cyberbullying than others. But youth can also be powerful agents of change. Clarke Sanders/Unsplash

Don’t be a bystander: Five steps to fight cyberbullying

Cyberbullying has become destructive and feels unstoppable. Here is a five-step technique for dealing with it.
A group of youth walked 1600 kilometers to bring attention aboriginal issues in 2013 at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. They hold up the Cree flag. By Paul McKinnon/Shutterstock.com

Media portrays Indigenous and Muslim youth as ‘savages’ and ‘barbarians’

Research shows that the Globe and Mail has created a script in which marginalized youth can only be dealt with as failures or criminals, impacting the way they are perceived in society.
Indigenous games like ‘Honour Water’ can teach Indigenous values and ceremonial practices. Honour Water/Elizabeth LaPensée

Video games encourage Indigenous cultural expression

A strengthening movement of Indigenous designers and developers is working to show Indigenous cultures, teachings, languages and ways of knowing through video games.
One way teachers can respect culture is by embedding it into ‘mainstream’ subjects. Tracey Nearmy/AAP

Back to school – understanding challenges faced by Indigenous children

Teachers – get to really know your kids, their families, their community and its history, and what’s going on at home. While school policies are important, relationships are the real keys to success.
Policies and services designed to protect Aboriginal children’s cultural connections are not being properly implemented. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Australia failing to safeguard cultural connections for Aboriginal children in out-of-home care

New reports show a widespread lack of care for the cultural needs of many of the 19,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection and out-of-home care.

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