Artikel-artikel mengenai International law

Menampilkan 1 - 20 dari 257 artikel

Lorelei Williams, right, whose cousin Tanya Holyk was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton and aunt Belinda Williams went missing in 1978, wipes away tears while seated with Rhiannon Bennett, left, following the release of the report on the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The MMIWG report: A call for decolonizing international law itself

The attempt to grapple with genocide by the MMIWG commission is about more than simply applying international law to the facts. It's also about decolonizing the international law of genocide itself.
Barrister Jennifer Robinson, one of the lawyers on Julian Assange’s legal team, and WikiLeaks’ editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson speak to reporters outside Southwark Crown Court in London on May 1. Facundo Arrizabalaga/AAP

Julian Assange has refused to surrender himself for extradition to the US. What now?

Extradition is a heavily regulated and multi-stage process. For now, it's impossible to say what awaits Assange.
Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda is seen in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court in 2018. (Bas Czerwinski/AP)

By not investigating the U.S. for war crimes, the International Criminal Court shows colonialism still thrives in international law

International law has deep connections to structures of power and inequality. Thankfully, committed jurists like Fatou Bensouda are fighting oppression through their unapologetic acts of resistance.
The case of Hakeem Al-Araibi (left), detained in Thailand while on honeymoon, raises questions about how Interpol red notices can be misused to target refugees. Diego Azubel/EPA/AAP

Explainer: what is an Interpol red notice and how does it work?

Interpol red notices play an important part in international policing. Here's how they work and how the system could be improved to safeguard human rights.
The Hague Convention on child abduction was drafted to deal with fathers abducting their children across borders after losing custody, but it’s applied mainly to mothers fleeing domestic violence. from shutterstock.com

Fleeing family violence to another country and taking your child is not ‘abduction’, but that’s how the law sees it

Under international law, a mother escaping domestic violence with her children to another country is seen as an abductor. She is often ordered to return the child leading to catastrophic consequences.
In 2014, this boy was affected by what activists say was a gas attack on the Syrian town of Telminnes; the most recent chemical attack was reported in late November, 2018 REUTERS/Amer Alfaj

Syria may be using chemical weapons against its citizens again – here’s how international law has changed to help countries intervene

For decades, international law did not allow one country to attack another that was using chemical weapons on its own people without UN approval. That’s changed, which means trouble for Syria.

Kontributor teratas

Lebih banyak