Artikel-artikel mengenai Melanoma

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Individuals using indoor tanning are exposed to two types of UV rays – UVA and UVB – that damage skin and DNA and can lead to cancer, including the deadliest one: melanoma. Young users are most at risk. By Rido/shutterstock.com

Health clubs using tanning beds to attract members despite cancer risks, new study shows

Many gyms use free tanning beds to lure in new members who are eager to look and feel their best. But this, argues Sherry Pagoto, runs against the health lifestyle premise these gyms are advocating.
Bright sun and fatty foods are a bad recipe for your DNA. By Tish1/shutterstock.com

How summer and diet damage your DNA, and what you can do

Scientists have long thought that regions of DNA called telomeres control how long you live. We are now learning that it is your diet and lifestyle that shape your telomeres, not the other way around.
Professor Fabian V. Filipp with his team working on precision targeting of malignant melanoma. Systems Biology and Cancer Metabolism Laboratory

Sure, cancer mutates, but it has other ways to resist treatment

Cancer is a disease of our genes, but resistance to therapy might go beyond cancer mutations. The DNA stays the same, but cancer cells outsmart the drugs by switching their gene activity.
People who are unable to tan and who have moles on their skin are among those at heightened risk of developing melanoma. from shutterstock.com

New online tool can predict your melanoma risk

Australians over the age of 40 can now calculate their risk of developing melanoma with a new online test.
Applications to list drugs on the PBS are usually submitted by the manufacturers of those drugs. from shutterstock.com

We don’t need to change how we subsidise ‘breakthrough’ cancer treatments

Some argue the current system of subsidising drugs in Australia needs changing to accommodate new cancer therapies. But two recent drug listings show the current system is working perfectly well.
Former President Jimmy Carter in Aug., 2015 at Maranatha Baptist Church in Plains, Ga. Carter was undergoing treatment for advanced melanoma at the time. Via AP. David Goldman/AP

Melanoma: Taming a migratory menace

Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, can usually be cured when caught early. When it has spread, however, it becomes a challenge. Recent findings are bringing hope. Here are a few examples.
Machines don’t make the same errors as humans when it comes to decisions based on visual analysis. from www.shutterstock.com

Can machines really tell us if we’re sick?

The value of machine learning is not only that it is more accurate than humans. It is also cheaper and more consistent in its diagnoses.
Where’s it gone? Guschenkova/Shutterstock.com

Why do some cancers suddenly disappear?

A few cancers vanish without any medical treatment. Researchers are studying these 'spontaneous regressions' to see if they can lead to new cancer treatments.
A mobile phone is not a medical device – so don’t believe apps that say they are. Jason Howie/Flickr

How to pick the good from the bad smartphone health apps

With an estimated 100,000 health and fitness apps available, it seems there is an app for everything – from tracking your bowel movements to practising your pimple-popping technique.
People who have many moles on their body – as well as those with atypical moles – have a predisposition to melanoma. ►►haley/Flickr

Research Check: do most melanoma patients have fewer than 20 moles?

A recent study claims most people with melanoma don't have many moles or any atypical moles. But exploring the study in depth shows these conclusions don't have a strong foundation.
International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified UV-emitting tanning devices as a Group I carcinogen – the most dangerous cancer-causing substances. Tanning bed via www.shutterstock.com.

Think indoor tanning is a safer alternative to sitting in the sun? Think again

Researchers have estimated that 8% of the five million cases of skin cancer diagnosed each year in the US can be attributed to indoor tanning.
Keytruda® targets a protein on the surface of immune cells that stopped them from attacking the melanoma cells. Australis Photography/Shutterstock

Explainer: how does Keytruda treat melanoma and why is it so costly?

Keytruda® is the latest drug to be registered in Australia for the treatment of widespread melanoma. But we must wait to see if it meets the cost-effectiveness targets for PBS subsidisation.
Sun exposure that doesn’t result in burning may still damage the skin cells. Rain/Flickr

Sun damage and cancer: how UV radiation affects our skin

Around 30 Australians are diagnosed with melanoma every day and more than 1,200 die from the disease each year. While small amounts of ultraviolet (UV) radiation are required for the production of vitamin…

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