Artikel-artikel mengenai Mexico

Menampilkan 1 - 20 dari 202 artikel

Migrants begin their day inside a former concert venue serving as a shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico, Dec. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

The challenge of parenting in a migrant caravan

The psychological health of migrant children will be deeply impacted by their flight from gang violence, and the experience of crowded unhygienic conditions and tear gas at the U.S. border.
Broken campaign promises have supporters wondering whether Andrés Manuel López Obrador will follow through on his commitment to ‘transform’ Mexico. Reuters/Henry Romero

López Obrador takes power in Mexico after an unstable transition and broken campaign promises

Mexicans want leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador to transform the country. But the months leading up to his inauguration sent worrying signs about how he he will use the massive power of his office.
Mexico’s President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador speaks about the upcoming changes his administration will impose on national security during the national peace and security plan conference in Mexico City on Nov. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Anthony Vazquez)

Mexico’s left turn and the road to uncertainty

The success or failure of Mexico's new president will have an impact on politics in the rest of Latin America as right-wing forces reclaim power. Is a brighter future for the region possible?
Mexicans surf the web at a ‘digital village’ in Mexico City in 2015, part of the country’s effort to get all citizens online. AP Photo/Sofia Jaramillo

Mexico wants internet access for all. Getting everyone online could reduce poverty, too

Mexico made internet connectivity a constitutional right in 2013, but most poor people still aren't online. Research shows that internet access would give these residents more economic mobility.
A new group of Central American migrants walk past Mexican Federal Police after wading across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Santiago Billy)

Why does the migrant ‘caravan’ exist? And how did it come to be?

A migrant caravan of almost 7,000 people who left Guatemala and Honduras is heading north towards the United States. The reasons they are leaving are complex but involve a U.S.-backed violent history.
Central American migrants face extortion, robbery, assault, kidnapping, rape and murder on their weeks-long journey through Mexico. Some find safety in numbers. AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Migrants travel in groups for a simple reason: safety

More than two-thirds of Central American migrants will experience violence on their journey through Mexico, from robbery and extortion to rape. Caravans create safety in numbers.
Mexican soldiers killed up to 300 student protesters and arrested 1,000 more on Oct. 3, 1968, in an event that’s come to be known as the Tlatelolco massacre. AP Photo

Massacres, disappearances and 1968: Mexicans remember the victims of a ‘perfect dictatorship’

Fifty years ago, soldiers gunned down hundreds of student protesters in a Mexico City plaza. It was neither the first nor the last time Mexico's army would be deployed against its own citizens.
Migrants in Sangatte, 2008. No border Network/Flickr

Migrants: deaths in the name of law

Little thought has been accorded to the way in which political and bureaucratic actors prioritise certain lives over others in their (non) decision-making.
Cable cars grace many urban skylines, including this one in Portland, in the United States. Patrick M/Flickr

Look up Australia, cable cars could ease our traffic woes

Popular as gondolas in ski-fields around the world, cable cars, aerial trams, wires or ropeways are increasingly used for mass transit in progressive cities. Is this the future for Australian cities?

Kontributor teratas

Lebih banyak