Artikel-artikel mengenai Mungo Man

Menampilkan semua artikel

It’s been 50 years since the find of burnt bones in ancient soil, eroded from deep in shoreline dune in NSW. Jim Bowler

Time to honour a historical legend: 50 years since the discovery of Mungo Lady

It's been half a century since Jim Bowler discovered Mungo Lady, which changed the course of Australian history. But now he says the find has fallen off the national radar, leaving a legacy of shame.
Lake Mungo and the surrounding Willandra Lakes of NSW were established around 150,000 years ago. from www.shutterstock.com

The Dreamtime, science and narratives of Indigenous Australia

New techniques for genetic analysis are helping us build more detailed and accurate stories about the ancient histories of the first Australians.
Fossilised ancient human footprints at the Mungo National Park. How are we to engage with a history that spans 65,000 years? Michael Amendolia/AAP

Friday essay: when did Australia’s human history begin?

Over the past half century, Australia has experienced a 'time revolution' with Indigenous history pushed back into the dizzying expanse of deep time. The latest discovery reminds us that science, like history, is an ongoing inquiry.
Mungo Man finally returns to where he was found in the Mungo National Park. Office of Environment and Heritage/J Spencer

Mungo Man returns home: there is still much he can teach us about ancient Australia

The remains of the first known Australian, Mungo Man, begin their journey home today. Scientists hope they'll still get a chance to study the ancient remains, working with the Traditional Owners.
The original excavation of Mungo Man, found near Lake Mungo in southwestern New South Wales, Australia. Wilfred Shawcross.

New DNA study confirms ancient Aborigines were the First Australians

Research first published in 2001 has been used to question of whether Aboriginal People were the First Australians. So why not re-test those results with improved techniques and equipment?
The 40,000-year-old remains of Mungo Man were discovered in 1974 on the southern sector of the eroding Lake Mungo shoreline. Jim Bowler

Mungo Man moves to National Museum, but he’s still not home

The remains of the Aboriginal man who lived more than 40,000 years ago are on the move again. But they're still not returning home, to the place where they were discovered four decades ago.
Willandra Lakes World Heritage Area in NSW – rich in ancient history. Steve Bourne

Working with Elders and return of First Australians’ remains

Evidence of the first people to settle in Australia can be found in the Willandra Lakes World Heritage Area, in western New South Wales, informally referred to as Australia’s Rift Valley. Hundreds of archaeological…

Kontributor teratas

Lebih banyak