Artikel-artikel mengenai Sugar tax

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As cities in developing countries - like Lagos in Nigeria, pictured here - grow, so do obesity risks. Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye

Developing countries could get sick before they get rich. Policy can help

Governments must understand that the factors making cities convenient and productive also make their residents prone to obesity. They must confront this challenge with intelligent, focused policies.
Taxing sugary drinks to tackle obesity would lead to a stronger economy, new research shows. from www.shutterstock.com

Taxing sugary drinks would boost productivity, not just health

The benefits of a sugar tax go beyond mere health savings when obesity rates drop. Our new research predicts wider economic benefits due to more, healthier people in work.
The type of sugar in popular soft drinks varies from country to country even if the brand name is the same. from shutterstock.com

We know too much sugar is bad for us, but do different sugars have different health effects?

A recent study found Australian soft drinks had higher concentrations of glucose than US soft drinks, which had more fructose. Does this mean Australian drinks are worse for health than US drinks?
This was the year of the health review, the NDIS, and Zika virus. Images sourced from one.aap.com.au

2016, the year that was: Health + Medicine

Health spent a lot of time in the spotlight in 2016. Medicare was a major issue in Australia’s federal election and numerous government reviews into health were announced and reported.
A tax on sugary drinks wouldn’t just prevent obesity, it could recoup some of the costs from obesity to the taxpayer. from www.shutterstock.com.au

A sugary drinks tax could recoup some of the costs of obesity while preventing it

Obesity imposes enormous costs on the community, through higher taxes to fund extra government spending on health and from foregone tax revenue because obese people are more likely to be unemployed.
South Africa’s proposed tax on sugary drinks will help improve public health despite the overwrought opposition from the industry. Shardayyy/flickr

Why Africa should resist the power of Big Sugar to undermine public health

The decision to tax sugary drinks in South Africa faces furious industry opposition, but global experience shows industry cannot be trusted to put public health before profits.
A can of regular soft drink contains 39 grams of total sugar, which is about 9 1/3 teaspoons of sugar and more than the recommended daily healthy limit for adults. Flickr / Shardayyy and WHO

Sugar tax is not nanny state, it’s sound public policy

Since Mexico introduced a 10% “tax” on sugar-sweetened beverages in 2014, global political momentum for this form of fiscal policy has been building. Societal interest and support have also grown. Taking…

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