Artikel-artikel mengenai US Congress

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Congress holds the power to propose and approve the federal budget. Patsy Lynch/ MediaPunch /IPX

Why Congress would keep working during a government shutdown

Even if other parts of the federal government shut down, Congress could – and would have to – keep working. A legal scholar explains why and how that is possible.
Top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor, left, and Foreign Service officer George Kent are sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during the first public impeachment hearing. AP/Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Photo

Impeachment: Two quotes that defined the first day of public hearings

The first day of public impeachment testimony was defined, in part, by strongly worded statements from Representatives Adam Schiff and Devin Nunes.
Despite courting the Jewish vote, President Trump has used anti-Semitic rhetoric. AP/John Locher

Anti-Semitism in the US today is a variation on an old theme

A task force has been assembled in the US Senate to fight anti-Semitism. A specialist in Jewish-American history says the group has a big job ahead of it. Anti-Semitism has a long history in the US.
U.S. forces are still in Syria, but their role has changed substantially in recent weeks. AP Photo/Baderkhan Ahmad

Could Congress reverse Trump’s decision to pull troops out of Syria?

Since the 1940s, Congress has largely let the president make decisions, while members of the House and Senate endorse or condemn those actions from the sidelines.
These Iowan supporters of Steve Bullock may hope he’ll make good on promises to get ‘dark money’ out of politics. AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall

What is ‘dark money’? 5 questions answered

A law professor explains political disclosure laws, how donors get around them – and what to do about it.
US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press briefing on October 8, 2019. She accused the White House of an “unlawful attempt to hide the facts” after it ruled out cooperating with an impeachment probe of President Donald Trump. Andrew Caballero/AFP

Trump and Nixon: Three key differences between 2019 and 1974

The impeachment investigation of US president Donald Trump has formally started, but much has changed since 1974, when Richard Nixon was forced out of office.
Trump’s approval rating has a lower ceiling and higher floor than that of past presidents. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas

Investigations usually hurt a president’s public reputation – but Trump isn’t usual

Investigations often damage the president's approval rating, particularly if the inquiry drags on for a long time. But that may not matter to a historically unpopular president like Trump.
North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in December 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

The Electoral College will never make everyone happy

A quirk of mathematics gives voters in some small states, like Rhode Island and Nebraska, an extra edge over voters in other states. This happens not only in the US, but in other countries, too.
Answering constituents in congressional offices often involves tabulating comments in a database. Office of Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont. via AP

How Congress turns citizens’ voices into data points

Advancements in computer technology are changing how Congress handles citizen communication, which affects how elected officials represent their constituents.
Winning the support of workers may be key to Democrats winning the 2020 election. Reuters/Lucas Jackson

How Democrats can win back workers in 2020

Hillary Clinton arguably lost in 2020 because she took workers for granted. Will Democrats make the same mistake again?

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