Artikel-artikel mengenai Violence against women

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The new sign commemorating the anniversary of the 1989 École Polytechnique shooting now recognizes that it was an attack against women and feminists. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

The Montréal Massacre is finally recognized as an anti-feminist attack

Thirty years after the Montreal Massacre that killed 14 women, new threats such as the incel movement pose dangers to the feminist movement.
Canadian statistics reveal that a woman is killed every five days by an intimate partner or a family member. This picture represents women killed from Jan. 1 to Nov 30, 2019. Canadian Femicide Observatory for Justice and Accountability

Remembering everyday violence against women and girls on Dec. 6

While we remember the women murdered 30 years ago, we shouldn't ignore those short, terse paragraphs in the news that describe the everyday, routine violence inflicted upon women.
A 19-year-old first-year student from Promoting Opportunities for Women in Engineering at McGill addresses Grade 11 students in 2017 in Montréal. Progress has been made to encourage more women to study STEM since the Montréal Massacre in 1989. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Montréal Massacre, 30 years later: My experience as a woman in engineering

Engineering is in a better place than in 1989. More women are studying the field, and academic administrators and managers want to hire female engineers. But more work is still needed.
On average, one woman every week is killed in Australia. There needs to be more focus on both response to gender violence and prevention. Jean Gerber/Unsplash

The latest action plan to tackle violence against women isn’t perfect, but it takes a much-needed holistic approach

We need to stop violence against women before it starts. The federal government's Fourth Action Plan might not provide all of the answers, but it's a sign of positive progress.
In Myanmar, gender inequality is fed by a deeply held concept called ‘hpon,’ which considers men to be spiritually and morally better than women. Reuters/Staff

Myanmar debates women’s rights amid evidence of pervasive sexual and domestic violence

In Myanmar, spousal abuse is legal and stigma stop most women from reporting sexual violence. A bill championed by feminists but long stalled in Parliament may soon give women their basic rights.

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