Artikel-artikel mengenai Western Australia

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Victoria has led the way in upgrading intercity rail services with medium-speed VLocity trains that have a cruising speed of 160km/h. Joe Castro/AAP

Let’s get moving with the affordable medium-speed alternatives to the old dream of high-speed rail

High-speed rail for Australia has been on the drawing boards since the mid-1980s but has come to nothing. Three states are developing medium-speed rail with federal funding, but NSW is missing out.
In the field studying the rock association in the Doolena Gap greenstone belt, 30 km north of Marble bar in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. David Murphy

How the Pilbara was formed more than 3 billion years ago

The remote Pilbara region of Western Australian formed many billions of years ago when the Earth was much hotter and the crust softer than it is today.
The Victorian mountain ash forest has been severely affected by fires and logging. To determine the actual health of the forest, we need to look at the quality, not just the quantity of what remains. Graeme/flickr

Why we are measuring the health of Australian vegetation poorly

In the aftermath of fires or logging, conservation needs to focus on recovering the health of the remaining vegetation, not just the size of the forest or woodland.
An echidna in the Western Granites at Jam Tree Gully. John Kinsella

Friday essay: species sightings

On his bush block in the WA wheatbelt, poet John Kinsella attempts habitat restoration and reflects on the responsibilities of the writer as a witness to species loss.
Contrary to popular belief, sex workers were more likely than not to report that their work enhanced their wellbeing. Author supplied

New report shows compelling reasons to decriminalise sex work

The study shows the negative effects of sex work's criminalisation, including a reluctance of workers to go to police and clients using it as an excuse to abuse workers.
Aboriginal dancers from Pinjarra perform at the unveiling of the counter-memorial in Esplanade Park, Fremantle, April 9 1994. Courtesy Bruce Scates

Monumental errors: how Australia can fix its racist colonial statues

A Fremantle monument to three white explorers was revised in 1994 to acknowledge the violence committed against Indigenous owners. As Australia struggles to reconcile its racist past, perhaps this monument shows a way forward.
Solar panels are still a rarity in WA’s lower-income areas. Orderinchaos/Wikimedia Commons

WA bathes in sunshine but the poorest households lack solar panels – that needs to change

Western Australia has huge amounts of sunshine and wind, yet only 7% of its energy comes from renewables. What's more, most households in the poorest suburbs are still locked out of the solar panel boom.
A message ploughed in the land calls on the federal government to help drought-affected farmers near the wheatbelt town of Kondinin in 2001. Liza Kappelle/AAP

Writing the WA wheatbelt, a place of radical environmental change

In two 30-year periods, an area in WA roughly the size of England was stripped of native vegetation for farming. It has produced some of our finest writers, from A.B. Facey to Dorothy Hewitt to Jack Davis.
Scott Morrison said the Productivity Commission had been asked to inquire into the impact of the current system of horizontal fiscal equalisation. Dan Himbrechts/AAP

GST carve-up to be examined by the Productivity Commission

The government has ordered the Productivity Commission to review how the GST revenue is sliced up.
Western Australia’s largest private solar array covers the roof of this food distribution centre in Perth’s south. AAP Image/Bidvest

Five things the east coast can learn from WA about energy

Despite its name, the National Electricity Market doesn't reach WA. But those charged with guiding the eastern states' energy transition should look west once in a while.

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