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Australian Synchrotron

The Australian Synchrotron is one of Australia’s newest and brightest major national research facilities.

Synchrotron science enables users to study the structure and properties of materials at unprecedented levels of detail. Synchrotron technologies surpass conventional methods and help drive innovation across many areas of pure and applied research and industrial development.

Since officially opening its doors in July 2007, the Australian Synchrotron has hosted thousands of visitors, scientific and otherwise. These have included around 2,000 individual users from research groups using the synchrotron’s state-of-the-art beamlines to further their research objectives, and hundreds more potential users we hope to see using the facility soon.

Enhanced access to synchrotron technologies is helping Australian scientific and industrial researchers to achieve and retain positions at the forefront of their fields, boosting Australia’s reputation in world scientific circles, enabling a stronger national contribution to the international development of advanced research capabilities and techniques, and attracting experts from around the globe to live and work in Australia.

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By the time you’ve read this caption, electrons in the synchrotron storage ring will have travelled a distance equivalent to 41 times around the Earth. manfred majer/Flickr

An electron’s near-light-speed tour of the Australian Synchrotron

There’s a place in Melbourne where particles routinely whiz around at 99.99998% the speed of light – the Australian Synchrotron. By accelerating charged particles to release extremely intense light known…
Magnetic resonance imaging uses the body’s most abundant molecule – water. Berkeley Lab

The science of medical imaging: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Our short series, the Science of Medical Imaging, examines the technology behind non-invasive methods of creating images of the human body. In this third and final instalment, we look at the basics of…
Computed tomography uses computer-analysed X-rays to produce ‘slices’ of the body. U.S. Pacific Fleet

The science of medical imaging: X-rays and CT scans

Our short series, the Science of Medical Imaging, examines the technology behind non-invasive methods of creating images of the human body. In this article, we discuss the technique of transmission imaging…
A patient undergoes a PET scan – but how does it work? Wikimedia Commons

The science of medical imaging: SPECT and PET

Our new series, the Science of Medical Imaging, examines the technology behind non-invasive methods of creating images of the human body. In this first instalment, we look at two types of emission imaging…
The multi-million dollar facility provides cutting-edge tools for scientists. Nancy Mills, Australian Synchrotron.

The Australian Synchrotron is great … but what does it do?

Science is like high-performance racing: today’s Formula One machine is all too soon the jalopy of tomorrow. The Australian Synchrotron, opened in 2007 and located in Melbourne, is currently at the F1…

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