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Charles Sturt University was established in 1989, building on a tradition of excellence in teaching and research spanning more than 100 years. It aims for excellence in education for the professions, strategic and applied research and flexible delivery of learning and teaching.

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Khayamiya or Egyptian Tentmaker Applique provides a memorable introduction to Islamic art. Photo by Timothy Crutchett Charles Sturt University

The invisibility of Islamic art in Australia

Islamic art in Australia is inaccessible and largely overlooked. It is rarely taught as a dedicated subject in Australian universities, and almost never seen beyond state capitals. Why?
Reclaim Australia is attracting a broad assortment of supporters based on a loosely defined platform of anti-Muslim, anti-immigration and economic protectionist sentiment. AAP/Mick Tsikas

Reclaim Australia re-energises radical nationalism

Reclaim Australia is not the first radical nationalist movement to emerge in Australia, and it has applied the lessons of past groups' mistakes to attract a broader range of people to its rallies.
Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, as self-declared caliph, seeks to exploit the historical resonance of the caliphate for a brutal present-day cause. EPA/Furqan Media

Caliphate, a disputed concept, no longer has a hold over all Muslims

The Caliphate has inspired disputes among Muslims for centuries, but attempts at revival in modern times are unlikely to succeed. Most of the world's Muslims would not accept its authority over them.
Seeking constant distractions and identifying with brands and status symbols, we struggle to escape the superficial self. Shutterstock/Sean De Burca

The lies of happiness: living with affluenza but without fulfilment

In the first of our series, On Happiness, the question is whether unsustainable consumption and debt can ever bring us happiness. The global financial question was a chance to take stock, yet did we learn anything?
Stoats (Mustela erminea), feral cats (Felis catus), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and black rats (Rattus rattus) are invasive predators in different parts of the world. Clockwise from top left: Sabec/commons.wikimedia.org (CC BY-SA 3.0); T Doherty; CSIRO/commons.wikimedia.org (CC BY 3.0); 0ystercatcher/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Killing cats, rats and foxes is no silver bullet for saving wildlife

Research published this week shows saving wildlife is much more complicated than killing introduced predators. Killing predators often doesn't work, and is sometimes actually worse for native wildlife.
To write off towns outside of Sydney and Melbourne as being bereft of culture is an arrogant falsehood. Briony Osei, Eve Beck and Jack Griffiths in The Bacchae. Photo taken by T J Lee

The Brandis effect on regional Australia? Just look at Bathurst

The term "regional arts" carries certain baggage that can create, and uphold, a divisive opposition between city and country. But there is plenty happening in regional Australia, and much to potentially lose.
Research shows monocultures of crops - such as this canola field - can be bad for the environment. Peter Hayward/Flickr

Single-crop farming is leaving wildlife with no room to turn

Monocultures - vast expanses of a single crop - may look pretty, but mounting research shows they are likely bad for environment. And in turn that's bad news for farms as well.
We often judge wine by the price tag, but it this a true indicator of its quality? Image sourced from www.shutterstock.com

What drives our wine choice – taste, or the price tag?

Can a wine drinker judge the quality of a bottle by its price? The nature of this relationship has always been contested. We expect that consumers are willing to pay more for higher quality wines, while…

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