Dalhousie University

Founded in 1818, Dalhousie University is Atlantic Canada’s leading research-intensive university, driving the region’s intellectual, social and economic development.

Dalhousie is a truly national and international university, with more than half of our nearly 19,000 students coming from outside of Nova Scotia. Our 6,000 faculty and staff foster a diverse, purpose-driven community, one that spans 13 faculties and conducts over $135 million in research each year.

With 80 per cent of Nova Scotia’s publicly funded research, and as one of Canada’s leading universities for industry collaboration, we’re helping generate the talent, discoveries and innovations that will shape Atlantic Canada’s future.

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Displaying 81 - 100 of 143 articles

Lisa MacLeod, Ontario’s minister of children, community and social services, announces an end to the province’s basic income pilot project on July 31, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Basic income: A no-brainer in economic hard times

Research shows that guaranteed basic income programs spur economies and improve mental and physical health. That's why Ontario's decision to scrap the province's pilot project is such a bad idea.
It’s barbecue season, a time of year that usually makes the meat industry happy. But an increasing number of Canadians, especially those under 35, are cutting out meat from their diets – a trend that should be causing serious alarm for meat producers. (Shutterstock)

The rise of the conscious carnivore

There have been an increasing number of reported anti-meat incidents around the world as more consumers second-guess their relationship with animal proteins. How can the meat industry adjust?
U.S. President Donald Trump gives North Korean leader Kim Jong Un a thumbs up during their meeting at a resort on Sentosa Island in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Casino Diplomacy: The Trump game that everyone loses

Donald Trump is unmoved by high risks and wild odds, apparently feeling that his sheer cunning will always win, including, now, in geopolitics — his latest casino.
No one really knows for certain what the market potential is for cannabis, much less for edibles, but growth opportunities are palatable. (Shutterstock)

The trouble with edibles

Cannabis-infused food products could shake up the food industry.
A different decision from the Supreme Court of Canada on inter-provincial trade barriers could have, among other things, finally forced politicians to deal with the country’s problematic supply management system for the dairy and poultry sectors. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The measly $292.50 that could have transformed Canada’s agrifood sector

The Gérard Comeau case was never just about beer. It was essentially about enabling Canada's domestic economy across the country to thrive. Here's how the Supreme Court of Canada got it so wrong.
Plastic debris strewn across a beach. (USFWS)

How to clean up our universal plastic tragedy

We're drowning in plastics. With governments setting un-ambitious targets, corporations are now listening to consumers who are demanding less plastic packaging and food containers.
U.S. President Donald Trump left the recent G7 summit in a fury about Justin Trudeau and vowing an escalated trade war. Canadians are responding by going Trump-free at the grocery stores – but it will likely be short-lived. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Canadians are going Trump-free – until it becomes too expensive

Every now and then, Canadians will take a stand against the U.S. by choosing Canadian items over American ones at the grocery store. Unless they cost more -- and most often, they do.
You’re not imagining things. The quantities of packaged foods really are shrinking as food manufacturers try to avoid hiking prices. Shrinkflation however is beginning to irritate consumers who feel they’re being cheated. (Shutterstock)

Shrinkflation: When less is not more at the grocery store

Canadians are bargain-hunters when it comes to food, and so food manufacturers try to keep prices low. But does that mean they should engage in 'shrinkflation?'
Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (NOAA Photo Library/flickr)

New fishing rules aim to protect Gulf of St. Lawrence right whales

After 17 North Atlantic right whales were killed or caught in fishing gear in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence in 2017, the Canadian government set new rules for the snow crab and lobster fisheries.
Empty grocery stores could be a sign of the future as grocery stores struggle to make profits and consumer preferences for more choice and services, including online shopping, evolve. Clark Young/Unsplash

The increasingly bleak outlook for Canadian grocery stores

Canada's bricks-and-mortar grocery stores are in trouble due to stagnant food prices and changing consumer preferences. More grocery store closures are likely on the horizon.
A hand touches the monument that honours the 26 coal miners who perished in the Westray mine disaster at the Westray Miners Memorial Park in New Glasgow, N.S. On the 26th anniversary of the disaster, are we doing enough to ensure those responsible for such disasters are accountable? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

The importance of accountability after deadly disasters

This week marks the 26th anniversary of the Westray mine disaster in Nova Scotia. There have been plenty of disasters since then but we still struggle to hold people to account when systems fail.
The province of Nova Scotia is leading the way in defining the terms of Canada’s ambiguous law on medically assisted dying. Here Liana Brittain is seen in Halifax in front of a projection of her late husband Paul B. Couvrette, who received a medically assisted death in P.E.I. on Sept. 15, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Can we die? The seriously ill need clarity

In Nova Scotia, it's clearer now who qualifies for medical assistance in dying. Will the other provinces and territories follow suit?
Filling out tax forms used to be an exercise in legalese torture for Canadian taxpayers. Canada has come a long way, but can still to more to simplify filing taxes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Doing taxes used to be an even bigger pain

In the 1950s, Canada made it easy for employees to file their income tax. Now let's simplify the process for others, too.
A Canadian politician has announced he plans to introduce a private member’s bill to remove the legal prohibitions on payments to surrogate mothers and to sperm and egg donors. (Shutterstock)

Paying surrogates, sperm and egg donors goes against Canadian values

There are sound ethical reasons behind Canada's decision to ban payment to surrogate mothers and sperm and egg donors in 2004. A new push to remove the restrictions ignores the risks.

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