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Since its establishment in 1966, Flinders University has enjoyed a well-justified reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It has a long-standing commitment to enhancing educational opportunities for all and a proud record of community engagement.

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The leaders debate returned Western Australia to the political spotlight this week. Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND

State of the states: more preference deals as pre-polling begins

Pre-poll votes within the first 24 hours were almost double the number at the same stage in 2016. That could hurt some minor parties who traditionally spend big in the last few weeks of a campaign.
The Coalition is expected to announce a preference deal with Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party on Monday. Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND

State of the states: Palmer’s preference deal and watergate woes

Clive Palmer was in the news this week after the Newspoll that showed that his United Australia Party could change the result in marginal seats in several states.
Le cœlacanthe actuel Latimeria dans son milieu naturel, en Afrique du Sud. Laurent Ballesta, Gombessa expeditions, Andromede Oceanology Ltd (from the book Gombessa, meeting with the coelacanth)

L’étrange cœlacanthe passé aux rayons X

Espèce menacée vivant dans les profondeurs marines, le cœlacanthe passionne depuis sa découverte en 1938. Notre nouvelle étude révèle pour la première comment son crâne et son cerveau se développent.
The Adani coal mine has become a key issue for voters. Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND

State of the states: Adani, economics and personality politics

West Australian voters need convincing that the Coalition will be better than Labor at managing the economy. Meanwhile, the Queensland seat of Dickson has already descended into personality politics.
The living coelacanth in its natural environment off the South African coast. Laurent Ballesta, Gombessa expeditions, Andromede Oceanology Ltd (from the book Gombessa, meeting with the coelacanth)

We scanned one of our closest cousins, the coelacanth, to learn how its brain grows

The discovery of a living coelacanth fish rocked the world in 1939, as scientists thought they had died out with the dinosaurs. A new study illuminates how its skull and tiny brain develop.
The spire collapses while flames are burning the roof of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris, France. Ian Langsdon/EPA

Notre Dame: how a rebuilt cathedral could be just as wonderful

With modern technology, it is entirely possible for the cathedral to be recreated with near-accuracy to the original. We can do this and keep the original building's spirit and feeling.
This large ‘Do Not Forget Australia’ sign in a yard at the Victoria school in Villers-Bretonneux, is the heir of smaller signs once placed in classrooms by Australian authorities. Author provided

Friday essay: do ‘the French’ care about Anzac?

Since the end of the first world war, the Australian media has often reported that ‘the French’ care about, remember and even venerate the Anzacs. But is this true? And which French people?
Keep up-to-date election campaign in each state. Shutterstock

Federal election 2019: state of the states

Keep up-to-date with how the federal election is playing out locally. Our State of the States series takes stock of the key issues, seats and policies affecting the vote in each of Australia's states.
Communications and Arts Minister Mitch Fifield during a press conference in Canberra in June 2018. Over the last six years of Coalition government, there has been a lack of strong policy initiatives and a neglect of smaller arts organisations. Lukas Coch/AAP

Arts and culture under the Coalition: a lurch between aggression and apathy

The Coalition government's approach to arts and culture policy has been one of ad hocism and neglect. Perhaps most serious has been the damage done to the Australia Council and the ABC.
Over the past five years, one in every four children who died by suicide in Australia was Indigenous. Shutterstock

Why are we losing so many Indigenous children to suicide?

Poverty and social exclusion play a big role in Indigenous child suicide. The causes are complex but we know enough to act now to reduce the number of deaths in our communities.

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