Flinders University

Since its establishment in 1966, Flinders University has enjoyed a well-justified reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It has a long-standing commitment to enhancing educational opportunities for all and a proud record of community engagement.

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Footpaths in Japan are built with bumpy guide-strips so vision impaired pedestrians can get around with ease.

The archaeology of polite society

From high chairs in public bathrooms to handbag baskets in cafes, Japan is a considerate place. Australia can learn from a society where material culture acts as a reminder to be aware of the needs of others.
Shelly Beach near Ballina, one of the new shark net locations, was the scene of a fatal shark attack in February 2015. Dave Hunt/AAP

Not just nets: how to stop shark attacks without killing sharks

Shark nets are controversial, which is why the New South Wales government is investigating a host of other ways to keep humans and sharks apart – some more tried and tested than others.
The kinds of activities volunteers can do have changed, from long-term activities to more short-term, episodic volunteering. AAP/Dan Peled

Why don’t more people volunteer? Misconceptions don’t help

Volunteers in Australia are essential to the provision of a range of services. Yet Western countries – including Australia – have recently reported a decline in volunteer rates.
The Theatre Royal in Hobart, Australia’s oldest continuously operating theatre. Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office/Flickr

What are the great Australian plays? Refining our theatre canon

The idea of a 'canon' changes over time and despite its elitist overtones, identifying one can be both illuminating and fun. In a new series, we nominate the best of Australian drama.
Rose and Groote Eylandters Nertichunga, Machana and Nabia, Groote Eylandt, 1941. Courtesy of SLNSW, Frederick Rose papers, Box 5

The red professor and the white anting that continues to this day

The book Red Professor: the Cold War Life of Fred Rose tells of a progressive anthropologist who was stymied by non-Indigenous people in powerful positions. Sadly, it's a narrative that still resonates today.
‘Universal Soldier’, 2014. Tony Albert, Australia, born 1981, Girramay/Kuku Yalandji people, Queensland, courtesy the artist and Sullivan+Strumpf, Sydney, photo by Greg Piper

Trench art tells a story of survival and resilience

For many Australians, our perceptions of the first world war and the foreign lands on which that war was fought have been shaped by our family’s war mementos: medals, uniforms, cigar cases, and other souvenirs…
The program can work well for polygamous species such as gorillas. Mary Ann McDonald/shutterstock.com

Swingers’ hookup program can find the right match for endangered species

Computer dating for animals? Finding the right matchup - using DNA rather than personality questionnaires - could help select the best partnerships for captive breeding programs.
Qilinyu, shown here front and top left, with its kin Entelognathus and small worm-like conodont animals swimming in the background. Dingua Yang/Inst. Vertebrate Palaeontology & Palaeoanthropology

Chew on this: we finally know how our jaws evolved

Next time you bite down on something you're eating, spare a thought for the evolutioniary leap made by an ancient fish that gave rise to our jaws.

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