Queen's University Belfast

Queen’s University Belfast is a member of the Russell Group of 24 leading UK research-intensive universities, providing world-class education underpinned by world-class research.

Founded as Queen’s College in 1845, it became a university in its own right in 1908. Today, it is an international centre of research and education rooted at the heart of Northern Ireland.

The University has won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education on five occasions – for Northern Ireland’s Comprehensive Cancer Services programme and for world-class achievement in green chemistry, environmental research, palaeoecology and law.

Four prestigious Times Higher Education (THE) Awards further recognises the University’s contribution to society. Queen’s received the award for Excellence and Innovation in the Arts in 2008, was awarded the title of the UK’s Entrepreneurial University of the Year in 2009, won the Outstanding Engineering Research Team of the Year category in 2010 and received the Most Innovative Teacher of the Year Award in 2011.

With more than 17,000 students and 3,500 staff, it is a dynamic and diverse institution, a magnet for inward investment, a patron of the arts and a global player in areas ranging from cancer studies to sustainability, and from pharmaceuticals to creative writing.

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Finance minister, Michael Noonan, made bold predictions for the Irish economy. Niall Carson/PA Wire

There’s more to Ireland than a ‘double Irish’ tax loophole

Ireland is to phase out its controversial “double Irish” tax scheme. It follows international criticism and the European Union’s investigation into the legalities of Apple and Ireland’s tax arrangement…
Lack of evidence. EPA/Peter de Jong

If Uhuru Kenyatta trial falls apart, the ICC may be doomed

Uhuru Kenyatta, incumbent president of Kenya, has finally appeared before the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague. He is charged with murder, forcible transfer, rape, persecution, and other…
The law won’t save you. EPA/Paul Buck

The law remains silent when it comes to sporting violence

The multi-million dollar settlement of damages from one of the National Hockey League’s most famous punches is a reminder that violent incidences rarely come to the attention of the courts, though they…
Is the sun setting on West African oil? A platform in Limbe, Cameroon. VirginieVV

US fracking boom puts West African oil economies at risk

After the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the US made a point of diversifying its sources of oil to reduce dependence on the Middle East. It was a strategic move which promised a huge boost to West African…
Joyce is remembered in many ways, but not often as a singer. nerosunero

This Bloomsday, remember Joyce as a traditional Irish singer

Bloomsday has come around again, the day (June 16) in 1904 on which all the events of James Joyce’s great novel Ulysses unfold. 1904 was an auspicious year for Joyce. It may surprise some people to know…
Iraqis fleeing from Mosul after ISIS took control. EPA/Kamal Akrayi

Explainer: what is ISIS and where did it come from?

Iraq is facing its most alarming crisis in years. The second city of Mosul and the major city of Tikrit have been seized by a violent jihadist group, ISIS – the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, formerly…
Qatari football fans celebrate … but for how much longer? Manaf Kamil

FIFA lawyers would find it hard to strip Qatar of the World Cup

Reports in the Sunday Times that improper secretive payments of millions of pounds were allegedly made to officials supporting Qatar’s bid for the 2022 World Cup have led to calls for the Gulf state to…
One pupil posted online that a teacher’s skin was ‘covered in potholes’. Dave Thompson/PA

Cyberbullying by parents and pupils takes toll on teachers

A new survey by the teachers union NASUWT has provided further evidence to confirm that teachers too, as well as pupils, can be targets of online bullying. In the research, just more than a fifth of the…
We need to break beyond operatic exclamations. Wikimedia Commons

The problem with arts advocacy is the people in power

“Wouldn’t you just die without Mahler?” This classic line from Willy Russell’s Educating Rita, spoken by the broken aesthete Trish, signifies both main character Rita’s entry into the realms of cultured…
Correcting Eire: the Irish state is serious about modernising. William Murphy/Flickr

Ireland’s post-crash reforms promise more than just recovery

The Republic of Ireland’s calamitous recent years of financial crisis and government dysfunction look to be coming to an end, with an economic recovery gathering pace and a new administration that seems…

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