Rochester Institute of Technology

Rochester Institute of Technology is home to leading creators, entrepreneurs, innovators and researchers. Founded in 1829, RIT enrolls about 19,000 students in more than 200 career-oriented and professional programs, making it among the largest private universities in the U.S.

The university is internationally recognized and ranked for academic leadership in business, computing, engineering, imaging science, liberal arts, sustainability, and fine and applied arts. RIT also offers unparalleled support services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. The cooperative education program is one of the oldest and largest in the nation. Global partnerships include campuses in China, Croatia, Dubai and Kosovo. 

For news, photos and videos, go to http://www.rit.edu/news.

Links

Displaying 21 - 36 of 36 articles

Worshippers at Ash Wednesday mass. AP Photo/Alan Diaz

Why do Christians wear ashes on Ash Wednesday?

Churches started to use ashes early as the ninth century as a symbol of repentance. In 1091, Pope Urban II ritualized their use to mark the beginning of Lent. Today, churches provide 'ashes to go.'
www.shutterstock.com

Americans are saving energy by staying at home

New research shows that computers, streaming video and other digital technologies are helping Americans spend more time at home and less out shopping and commuting, yielding measurable energy savings.
Members of Patriotic Millionaires, whose privileged members advocate for higher taxes on the rich, met with lawmakers in this 2015 photo to discuss legislation to close the carried interest loophole. Senate Democrats

How some rich people are trying to dismantle inequality

When the wealthy become unlikely allies in the fight against inequality, they often take similar steps. It all starts with acknowledging their own privileges.
Poul Henningsen’s Artichoke Lamp, viewed from below at London’s Park Plaza Hotel. Doc Searls/Wikimedia Commons

From the mundane to the divine, some of the best-designed products of all time

We asked five design experts – what's your favorite product of all time, and why?
When it comes to TV use energy, calling one household ‘average’ can be misleading. Evert F. Baumgardner - National Archives and Records Administration.

TV-watching couch potatoes have outsized energy footprint

People who watch a lot of TV consume a disproportionate amount of electricity so we should tailor energy efficiency incentive programs to these and other big energy users.
Poor people are more vulnerable to the effects of climate change, such as extreme weather and sea level rise, yet have contributed little to the causes. asiandevelopmentbank/flickr

Making the moral case on climate change ahead of Paris summit

More than 2,000 academics, including philosophers and ethicists, are urging global leaders at the Paris climate summit to focus on the moral dimensions of climate change.
Exxon’s about-face on climate science exposes the critical role of internal corporate scientists. jeepersmedia/flickr

Corporate climate scientists: advocates for science or protectors of status quo?

Exxon wasn't the only giant corporation to have climate scientists in the 1980s. Scientists at GM and Ford also honed in on climate change, but they – and their companies – took very different paths.
Better communication may have saved lives in Italy’s L'Aquila earthquake. TheWiz83

Is misinformation about the climate criminally negligent?

The importance of clearly communicating science to the public should not be underestimated. Accurately understanding our natural environment and sharing that information can be a matter of life or death…

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors