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South Western Sydney Local Health District

Local Health Districts have come about as a result of the NSW Government’s support for national health reform. NSW was the first state in Australia to implement these new locally managed health Districts.

Local decision-making is at the forefront of how the new organisation will function, led by a professional Health District Board and LHD Chief Executive.

The South Western Sydney Local Health District Board is chaired by Professor Phillip Harris AM and ten Board Members who bring a wealth of experience and local knowledge to the management of our LHD: Professor Phillip Harris AM (Chair) Associate Professor Mark Sheridan Mr John Gordon Ms Carolyn Burlew Professor Brad Frankum Mr Mark Johnson Ms Debbie Roberts Dr Jens Kilian Ms Christine Carriage Dr Kathryn Gibson Professor Margot Kearns The Health District Board and Chief Executive are responsible for:

Improving local patient outcomes and responding to issues that arise throughout our Local Health District.

Monitoring the performance of our Local Health District against performance measures in the LHD Service Agreement.

Delivering services and performance standards within an agreed budget, based on annual strategic and operating plans. This forms the basis of our Local Health District Service Agreement.

Ensuring services are provided efficiently and accountably. Production of Annual Reports that are subject to State financial accountability and audit frameworks. Maintaining effective communication with local and State public health stakeholders.

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Articles (1 - 3 of 3)

Antihistamines are the first-line treatment for those with mild or occasional hay fever. Tina Franklin/Flickr

Hay fever survival guide: why you have it and how to treat it

Three million Australian adults – 15% of the population – struggle through spring and summer with watery eyes, running nose, itchy throat and the hallmark hay fever symptom, sneezing. When people with…
Damp conditions are linked to respiratory problems, but mould may not be the cause. AAP/Kym Agius

Queenslanders at risk from mould as flood clean-up continues

The floods have come and gone in Queensland and in their wake are heartbreak, devastation and months, if not years, of clean-up and rebuilding. Those affected now face a hidden risk to their health from…
Seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (or pollinosis in Europe) is one of the most common chronic respiratory conditions seen in medical practice. Marco Raaphorst

Achew! It’s hayfever season again

Spring and summer are accompanied for many with the much less welcome start of another bout of “hayfever”. A term originating in England, “hayfever” arose out of the popular belief that the ailment was…

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