Texas A&M University

Texas A&M is the state’s oldest public university and largest university, and one of the largest in the nation: a research-intensive, land-grant institution with 68,400 students, including 14,900 in graduate or professional school. Students choose from more than 130 undergraduate and 240 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools, and participate in more than 1,100 student-run organizations and activities (including the Big Event, the largest one-day, student-run service project in the United States).

Texas A&M ranks sixteenth nationally in research expenditures, with more than $892 in FY2016 (National Science Foundation), and is a member of the Association of American Universities. Texas A&M ranks at or near the top among universities nationally in the areas of academic excellence, value, and affordability; on-time student graduation rates (both overall and for minorities); student engagement and happiness; and students who graduate with less college-related debt and become the nation’s highest-earning graduates. Texas A&M also is tied for having the most graduates serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.

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Could the solution to a nuclear North Korea lie in arbitration? Reuters/Damir Sagolj

Arbitration as a way out of the North Korean crisis

Trump and Kim are due to meet this spring. But if these talks fail could international arbitration provide - as it has in the past - an alternative way out of the North Korean crisis?
In this March 18, 2011 photo, Cassidy Hempel waved at hospital staff as she was being treated for a rare disorder. Her mother Chris, left, fought to gain permission for an experimental drug. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Giving patients the ‘right to try’ experimental drugs is a political maneuver, not a lifesaver

Congress has sent a bill to the White House. It gives terminally-ill patients more false hope than chances for a cure.
In this Dec. 3, 2014 photo, liver cancer patient Crispin Lopez Serrano talks to an oncology nurse at a hospital in Clackamas, Ore. AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka

How kindness can make a difference in cancer care

Great strides have been made in cancer medicine over decades, but it's important not to forget the growing role that kindness and empathy play in good care.
‘I don’t care what they say about me,’ P.T. Barnum once said, ‘as long as they spell my name correctly.’ Everett Historical/Shutterstock.com

How the ‘Greatest Showman’ paved the way for Donald Trump

The new movie about P.T. Barnum couldn’t come at a better time: It's impossible not to see his ghost in our culture, in our advertisements and in our president.
When self-driving cars get in crashes, who’s to blame? Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority via AP

Redefining ‘safety’ for self-driving cars

If autonomous vehicles are going to be safer than human drivers, they'll need to improve their ability to perceive and understand their surroundings – and become the ultimate defensive drivers.
Fracking has led to an increase in truck traffic, one of the reasons for worsening trends on air quality in areas with oil and gas drilling. AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

How has the US fracking boom affected air pollution in shale areas?

The fracking boom has led to a large increase of hydrocarbon emissions in rural areas, reversing some regional air toxics trends.
Pres. Trump shows off an executive order he signed Oct. 12, 2017 to undo parts of the Affordable Care Act. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Will Obamacare marketplaces suffer as open enrollment begins?

Frustrated with Congress for its failure to replace Obamacare, President Trump took matters into his own hands and issued an executive order to nix parts of it. How his order will play out is unknown.

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