Endorsed by University of Johannesburg

The University of Johannesburg, one of the largest, multi-campus, residential universities in South Africa, seeks to achieve the highest distinction in scholarship and research. Born from the merger between the former Rand Afrikaans University (RAU), the Technikon Witwatersrand (TWR) and the Soweto and the East Rand campuses of Vista University in 2005, the University of Johannesburg fosters ideas that are rooted in African epistemology, but also addresses the needs of South African society and the African continent as it is committed to contribute to sustainable growth and development.

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President Jacob Zuma delivers his State of the Nation address. Reuters/Schalk van Zuydam

South Africa’s president failed to touch the nerve of the nation

Jacob Zuma tried to cover everything under the sun in his State of the Nation address. The speech was not pivoted on an anchor. It was a collection of inputs from various government departments.
Students demand free access for all at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mark Wessels/Reuters

Quality, free university education is necessary – and possible

Many people dismiss the idea of free, quality public university education out of hand. But there are many ways to make it happen - and it all ties back to the idea of education as a public good.
School fee exemptions that are meant to help poor families can actually cause them major problems. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

University protests are important – but school fees also matter

South Africa's fee exemption system is at the heart of a deepening divide in the country's school sector. It's time for a major relook at how this policy is applied.
Bill Gates pioneered the Breakthrough Energy Coalition, an initiative by 28 billionaires to push for more funding for clean energy. EPA/Ian Langsdon

Why the rich should do more to save the world

In the age of austerity, governments have limited resources to invest in new areas of research – like clean energy – that have multiple risks. Billionaires like Bill Gates can help plug the gap.
Toxic leaders make for exploitative, destructive, devaluing and demeaning work experiences. Shutterstock

How toxic leaders destroy people as well as organisations

Three in ten leaders across the world are toxic. Toxic leaders destroy individuals as well as organisations, and affect the performance of a society and country.
South Africa was hit by an unprecedented wave of student protests against fee hikes, racism and for the decolonisation of curriculum. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Want to understand the decolonisation debate? Here’s your reading list

Many works published on decolonisation originate from Ngugi wa Thiongo's idea of decolonising the African mind. Imperialism, he writes, has left its mark on the minds of the previously colonised.
Nhlanhla Nene, South Africa’s former finance minister. President Zuma’s decision to fire him is irrational. EPA/Nic Bothma

Why Zuma’s actions point to shambolic management of South Africa’s economy

It is difficult to analyse political developments in South Africa. Decision-making does not fit any neat political science theory. President Zuma is unpredictable and his policy thinking is woolly.
Presidents Hollande and Obama. Is it still possible for nation states to build a global alliance against organisations such as Daesh? Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

States and gangs: the difficult search for new ways to run the world

To save mankind from the scourge of war… These eight words drawn from the preamble to the Charter of the United Nations have been ringing in my head for the past week. Most believe that they were penned…
Miners pray during the one-year anniversary commemoration of the killings of 34 striking miners by police outside Lonmin’s Marikana platinum mine. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Marikana massacre: how South African journalism failed the test

The reporting of the Marikana massacre was characterised by embedded journalism, sensationalism and polarisation of views. The media became a loudspeaker for powerful political and economic interests.
Grim, single sex workers' hostels are still common in South Africa’s economic capital Johannesburg. Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

What architects must learn from South African student protests

Architects and those working on the built environment can learn valuable lessons about their discipline – how it's taught, and how it's carried out – from the 2015 student protests.
South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma being welcomed on his arrival in Khartoum by Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir earlier this year. Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

Leaving the ICC won’t absolve South Africa of its legal obligations

South Africa's withdrawal from the ICC could have mere symbolic value. The country will continue to have obligations to binding decisions taken by the UN Security Council – including those pertaining to the court.
Phishing is a growing problem across Africa. South Africa has the highest number of victims. shutterstock

What South Africa is doing to make a dent in cyber crime

Cyber security has been identified as a global challenge, with Africa facing renewed threats through increasing internet use across many platforms.
Universities are losing sight of their role as places of teaching and learning. Instead, they are becoming hugely stressed business enterprises. Shutterstock

South Africa’s universities risk becoming bureaucratic degree factories

When funding imperatives dominate universities' strategies, higher education loses sight of the work it ought to be doing: developing graduates who can make a real difference in the world.

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