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The University of Queensland, established in 1910, is the largest university in Queensland. UQ is a pace-setter in discovery and translational research, and is committed to teaching excellence and outstanding mentorship that leads to well-rounded graduates who are equipped to live and work effectively in a global environment.

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Indigenous people make up just 4.2% of the Queensland population, but are the subjects of 21% of domestic violence protection order applications. Shutterstock

How Indigenous women have become targets in a domestic violence system intended to protect them

A new study in Queensland shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are far more likely to be targeted by domestic violence protection orders than the general population.
Vincent Copley senior and Vincent Copley junior at Redbanks Conservation Park, Burra, in June, 2018. They are holding Ngadjuri book, with their grandfather and great-grandfather, Barney Waria, on the cover. Photo: C.J. Taylor, Flinders University.

Friday essay: who owns a family’s story? Why it’s time to lift the Berndt field notes embargo

In the 1940s, the last initiated Ngadjuri man, Barney Waria, gave a series of interviews to anthropologist Ronald Berndt. Almost 80 years later, Waria's grandson wants to share this material with his family.
The southern elevation of Two Pavilion House, showing the separate pavilions that give the house its flexibility. Image: Scott Burrows

We need more flexible housing for 21st-century lives

People living with the change and uncertainty of this century need flexible and adaptable housing. Here we look at a couple of examples of what's possible.
Autonomous vehicles are coming to our cities – in fact, driverless buses are already on the road in Adelaide. David Mariuz/AAP

Why driverless vehicles should not be given unchecked access to our cities

To maximise the benefits and limit the costs, the use of autonomous vehicles should be pooled and their access to the city restricted.
The MK 15 Phalanx close-in weapons system, on the USS Reuben James guided-missile frigate, fires during an exercise. Flickr/US Pacific Fleet

Why it’s so hard to reach an international agreement on killer robots

We already have some autonomous weapons – so talk of any ban should focus on where we draw the line on what is acceptable, and what is not. Can we at least agree on that?
Conflict, and not the separation itself, is a greater predictor of how children will fare post-divorce. from www.shutterstock.com

How will my divorce affect my kids?

Most parents worry how their child will fare after divorce. Most will be fine, so long as they don't witness conflict.
Many early education and care workers earn little above the minimum wage. www.shutterstock.com

Why Australia should invest in paying early childhood educators a liveable wage

Valuing the skills and contributions of our educators and reversing the high rates of turnover is critical and can only be achieved through fair pay and rewards.
The Timber Creek claim is being seen as a test case for future Indigenous land rights compensation claims. Maleika Halpin/CrowdSpark

How will Indigenous people be compensated for lost native title rights? The High Court will soon decide

The decision will have huge implications for Indigenous peoples who have lost their land rights and for state and territory governments that may be liable for compensation.
A medieval engraving of the persecution of witches: historians are increasingly demonstrating that belief in witchcraft survived in Western Europe well into the 18th, 19th and even 20th centuries. Wikimedia Commons

Can we learn from the past in tackling witchcraft-related violence today?

It is estimated that thousands of people are killed in witchcraft-related violence around the world each year. How can we tackle this problem today?
In refusing to strike out Smith’s claim, the court has accepted that it is arguable police could owe a common law duty of care to specific victims of domestic violence to protect them from preventable harm. AAP/James Ross

Court opens door to domestic violence victim to sue police for negligence

A Victorian woman claims police were negligent in failing to prevent breaches of protection orders against her ex-partner – a case that may open up new legal avenues in domestic violence cases.

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