University of Aberdeen

The University of Aberdeen is today at the forefront of teaching, learning and discovery, as it has been since its founding in the year 1495. This ambitious, research-intensive university attracts outstanding academics from the world’s most prestigious centres of learning, and a multinational student community taking advantage of courses, facilities, opportunities, and a unique student experience designed for the needs of the twenty-first century.

Through over 500 years the University of Aberdeen has developed a strong national and international reputation for its academic strength. Aberdeen academics and alumni have pioneered many developments in medicine, science, social sciences and humanities. Five Nobel Laureates are associated with the University.

The University’s research profile is grounded on a broad-based platform across a wide range of disciplines. The aim is to make a difference to both the world of knowledge and knowledge of the world. In all research areas, the University engages with policy, industry and public audiences to encourage and inform public debate, and stimulate interdisciplinary, joined-up action to address the big issues and questions facing today’s global community.

The University has identified four priority interdisciplinary research themes: Energy, Environment and Food Security, Pathways to a Healthy Life, and The North. All build on areas of current research excellence, and bring together academics in different specialties to contribute their own perspective and expertise to a topical world problem.

See www.abdn.ac.uk for:

  • the latest news from the University and its researchers
  • more about research themes and wider research activity
  • events including festivals, lectures, community cafes, exhibitions and concerts
  • new undergraduate and postgraduate programmes and opportunities for professional development

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Displaying 301 - 320 of 323 articles

Shadows of things to come (or so they hope…) Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

The Queen, the pound and the EU: Salmond’s Scotland plan

Just two days after the latest polls showed the “Yes” vote for Scottish independence gaining on the pro-unionists, the Scottish government’s White Paper, Scotland’s Future: Your Guide to an Independent…
These ones look rather large. Autowitch

Are high-speed antidepressants as sweet as they sound?

Depression is a common, recurrent, disabling and potentially life-threatening disorder that accounts for much misery worldwide. Current treatments are imperfect: most studies suggest that chemical antidepressant…
Diet and a little bit of sun can give us vitamin D. Julian Colton

Vitamin D needed to fight comeback of childhood rickets

For most people, our standard diet provides all the necessary vitamins we need. However, childhood vitamin D deficiency in the UK – something that should be a headline from the distant past – has made…
Life on the streets: a checkpoint on the Gaza Strip. Wikimedia Commons

Peace stymied by realities of life in West Bank and Gaza

Far from relaxing its economic blockade on Gaza as its negotiators sit across the table from their Palestinian counterparts in the latest attempt at peace talks, Israel has tightened the screw - reimposing…
The BT van is taking its sweet time and some are tired of waiting. Loopzilla

Disused loos and elbow grease break BT broadband monopoly

While broadband internet services get faster and faster for some, there are communities in the UK that are not fully benefiting from the technology. It has recently become clear that many communities in…
Trawlermen making the seabed a better plaice. Julien Behal/PA

A bottom-trawling ban could see fish stocks fall

Bottom trawling by fishing fleets has caused widespread concern over the environmental damage done to seabed habitats and marine life. It seems obvious that powerful boats towing large heavy nets that…
#timeforlunch brb. Sean Gray

Forget tweeting, meet the birds who blog

Researchers in Aberdeen and the RSPB have set up a project that enables Scottish birds to write their own blogs. Readers will be able to track the daily lives of red kites as they travel around the Scottish…
Long distances make for long response times in rural settings. robert wade

High-tech monitoring helps hard-to-reach patients

The first minutes of a medical emergency can be crucial for a patient’s chances of recovery, but what if that emergency happens in a rural setting, far away from help? Scottish ambulance crews respond…
Here come the boys. Martin McKeown

A tale of two cities - marching season in Northern Ireland

Given the power of symbols and parades to generate violence in so-called post-conflict Northern Ireland, it is with some anxiety that the region waits on another round of contentious parades this weekend…
For a large amount of money, you can now get vitamins through an intravenous drip. Toshiyuki IMAI/Flickr

Why eat your vitamins when you can now shoot them up?

Now appearing in a tabloid near you, reports of the latest fad – infusion of intravenous vitamins, which, exactly as described, is vitamins applied through an intravenous drip. Sounds a little extreme…
More than 15 years after the peace settlement and Belfast’s burning again. Paul Faith/PA Wire

Belfast violence symbolises lost peace process

Some 15 years after the Good Friday Agreement, troubles are once again making Northern Ireland internationally newsworthy. The return of former senior US State Department official Richard Haass as special…
Still waiting to load the hamster dance… Scorpians and Centaurs

Out of town, out of the loop: rural areas need broadband

The National Audit Office has warned that the government is two years behind schedule in its plan to bring broadband to 44 rural areas by 2015. It now looks like only nine of these areas will be linked…
This Yellow Wagtail is a fugitive in flight, but forensic technology will track him down. Flickr: jcoelho

CSI: Birding … barcoding the past, present and future

The extinction of an animal is no longer the end of our opportunity to learn new things about its ecology and biology. The same technology that recently reconstructed the genome of the Neanderthal man…
Big question: Scotland will get the chance to decide on its future. Scottish government

Scottish independence: simple question - but no easy answers

Foundation essay: This article on the debate over Scottish independence is part of a series marking the launch of The Conversation in the UK. Our foundation essays are longer than our usual comment and…
Just eat them, they’re good for you. PA/Ben Birchall

Taking high doses of vitamins can do more harm than good

Without vitamins in our diet we wouldn’t survive but taking too many can be harmful. There’s a limit to how much we actually need. However, since the discovery of vitamins - or “vital amines” as they were…
It’s not just oil that these rigs extract. Sometimes they reveal life quite alien to us. Nepenthes

Microbes living deep under the sea reveal the extremes of life

Over the past 20 years, research has revealed large populations of creatures living many miles below the Earth’s surface. Now, a new study published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports conducted by…
Frack orf: fracking hasn’t had the same reception here as it has in the US. Georgie Gillard/PA

Laying down the law over fracking

Foundation essay: This article on the different international attitudes to fracking by Professor John Paterson, Chair in Law at Aberdeen University, is part of a series marking the launch of The Conversation…
You want a receipt for that, guv? Stephen Byers famously described himself as a ‘cab for hire’ Nyall and Maryanne via Creative Commons

Learn to love lobbying - it’s part of the ugliness of democracy

I had better declare an interest: it’s that sort of week. I co-edit a journal called Interest Groups and Advocacy. This is of no interest to HMRC, but the journal’s name merits examination in the context…

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