University of Alaska Fairbanks

Here at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, as wisdom passes from one generation to the next, revolutionary ideas are thriving and a new academic culture is taking shape.

With undergraduates making up 89 percent of the total student body, UAF is a hotbed of diversity and fresh thinking. Whether you’re returning to school to start a new phase of your life or coming in as a recent high school graduate, you’ll quickly make new friends with a similar drive to achieve. And, because our backyard is the vast environmental laboratory of Alaska, UAF attracts exceptional individuals — academic superstars and adventure-seekers alike.

With seven campuses across the state, we are home to more than 11,000 students from all over the world — each in pursuit of something extraordinary.

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A pod of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in central Baffin Bay. Narwhals are the most vulnerable animals to increased ship traffic in the Arctic Ocean. Kristin Laidre/University of Washington

As Arctic ship traffic increases, narwhals and other unique animals are at risk

Climate change is shrinking Arctic sea ice and opening the region to ship traffic. Whales, seals and other marine mammals could be at risk unless nations adopt rules to protect them.
2016’s warm winter meant not enough snow for the start of the Iditarod sled dog race in Anchorage, so it was brought by train from 360 miles north. AP/Rachel D'Oro

In Alaska, everyone’s grappling with climate change

For everyone from traditional hunters to the military, the National Park Service to the oil industry, climate change is the new reality in Alaska. Government, residents and businesses are all trying to adapt.

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