University of British Columbia

The University of British Columbia is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the top 20 public universities in the world. Since 1915, UBC’s West Coast spirit has embraced innovation and questioned the status quo. With close to 63,000 students from 160 countries and more than 5,400 faculty on two campuses in Vancouver and the Okanagan, UBC is a place where bold thinking develops into ideas that can change the world. Its entrepreneurial perspective encourages students, staff and faculty to challenge convention, lead discovery and explore new ways of learning.

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Ontario Premier Doug Ford, seen here walking on the front lawn of the Ontario Legislature in June, is vowing to deliver on his campaign promise to scrap the “disastrous” cap-and-trade system and fight a federal carbon tax. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Taxpayers will back a carbon tax if they get a cheque in the mail

Ontario and Saskatchewan are vociferously fighting the federal government's carbon tax efforts. But rather than back down, Ottawa should embrace a simple, fair and transparent “carbon dividend.”
Genetic ancestry testing might all seem like harmless fun, but there is a downside. (Shutterstock)

Genetic ancestry tests don’t change your identity, but you might

The results of genetic ancestry tests are grossly over-simplified. A new study shows the tests reinforce what you want to believe rather than offering objective, scientific proof of who you are.
A guard walks by toys placed by protesters at a shelter for unaccompanied children in Homestead, Fla. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

How we all suffer when migrant children are harmed

Canada's residential school system and the Holocaust offer clear lessons -- that the harm done to migrant children will impact multiple generations of Americans.
A protester holds a photo of an oil-soaked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during a demonstration against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion in Vancouver on May 29, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Justin Trudeau’s risky gamble on the Trans Mountain pipeline

The Trudeau government's decision to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline from Kinder Morgan is incredibly risky. Here's why.
Nature offers many benefits to people. (Shutterstock)

It pays to invest in biodiversity

Governments around the world have vowed to halt the loss of global biodiversity by 2020, but without more investment, we'll miss some of the targets.
Heavy rainfall triggered extensive flooding across the province of Alberta in 2013. (Ryan L. C. Quan/Wikimedia)

Damage from flooding doesn’t have to be inevitable

Calgary has already had two 100-year floods in less than a decade. But the city and the province have yet to take action to meaningfully lower the risk of future flood damages.
The author, second from left, is seen in this photo in a designed leadership dialogue session. The techniques of designers can help make us better leaders. (UBC School of Public Policy and Global Affairs)

How the mindset of designers can make us better leaders

The mindset, tools and techniques of designers can make us better leaders. Here's how.
Women and people of colour experience “chilly climates” at academic science conferences. (Shutterstock)

Race and gender still an issue at academic conferences

The geosciences are the least diverse of all STEM fields. Inhospitable climates at academic science conferences may be one of the reasons.
One third of women will suffer violence at the hands of someone they love, sometimes resulting in traumatic brain injury. Here, women lay on the street to protest this violence, in Pamplona in northern Spain, in 2015. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)

Traumatic brain injury: The unseen impact of domestic violence

Globally, one third of women suffer violence at the hands of someone they love. And for those who survive domestic abuse, traumatic head injury can be the devastating outcome.
Barney Williams Jr., a residential school survivor, hugs Santa Ono, president of the University of British Columbia, during the opening of the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre at Vancouver, on April 9. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ben Nelms

A university president apologizes for academia’s role in residential schools

The role of universities in the shameful Indian residential school system needs to be addressed. The president of one of Canada's leading universities explains why it's time to apologize.
Taxing sugar places the burden on the poor – people who are already burdened by higher rates of heart disease, obesity and diabetes. (Shutterstock)

How sugar taxes punish the people

Sugar taxes fail to tackle the root of the problem -- the production and marketing of foods that cause chronic disease.
A woman enters Maple High School in Vaughan, Ont., to cast her vote in the Canadian federal election in October 2015. Canada has a lot to learn from Europe in preventing the digital manipulation of voters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Power

What Europe can teach Canada about protecting democracy

Several critical Canadian elections are looming. Here's what Canada can learn from Europe on how to prevent the digital manipulation of voters.
Nellie McClung, a prominent Canadian suffragist in the early 1900s, is now being maligned for her racism and support of eugenics. Should the deep flaws of some suffragists from 100 years ago mean Canadian historians must pay them short shrift? (National Archives)

Canada’s curiously cautious commemoration of women suffragists

Canada is strangely muted in celebrating women's suffrage. That's because the politics of remembrance has become a contemporary minefield.
Chinese women carry a disproportionate share of family responsibilities. Having more children and greater family demands could increase women’s work-family conflicts and jeopardize women’s careers. With the two-child policy, conflicts between work and family responsibilities are likely to worsen. Shutterstock

China’s two-child policy needs to come with child-care help

How does the two-child policy in China impact women's equality? Do women have the ability to stop when they no longer want more children?
Homes are surrounded by floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey in Spring, Texas on Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Why some conservatives are blind to climate change

Despite strong evidence that human activities have altered the climate, not everyone sees the risks. New research explains why some people seem blind to the signs of climate change.
Indigenous community members are doing the work to situate Colten Boushie’s life and death within the colonial context, answering not if race was a factor, but how and why. Colten Boushie’s brother, Jace Boushie, looks on during a media event at the Battlefords Agency Tribal Chiefs office after a jury delivered a verdict of not guilty in the trial of Gerald Stanley. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

Stanley trial highlights colonialism of Canadian media

What can the events surrounding Colten Boushie’s death, the trial verdict and its media coverage tell us about the role of journalism and journalists in relation to Indigenous concerns in Canada?
Parents wait for news after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. AP/Joel Auerbach

Why security measures won’t stop school shootings

When school shootings take place, beefed up security is often seen as a solution. Experience shows, however, that school shootings stem from social factors that require a different response.

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