University of California, Davis

UC Davis is one of the world’s leading cross-disciplinary research and teaching institutions, located in Davis, California. The most academically comprehensive university on the West Coast, it is renowned for its programs in food and agriculture, the environmental sciences and sustainability, and veterinary medicine. Among its many accomplishments, it has helped develop the wine industry, pioneered new medical treatments and altered the art world. Part of the University of California system, UC Davis has 100+ majors, 10 colleges and professional schools, a health system, and research stations throughout California and beyond.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 79 articles

Several studies have shown that health suffers after being laid off, as fear and anxiety lead to stress. VGstockstudio/Shutterstock.com

How can job loss be bad for health, and recession be good for it?

The negative effects of job loss have been well-documented and fairly well-understood. But why would studies also suggest that health improves during a recession? The reasons may surprise you.
Cooked chicken meat imported from China could end up in U.S. restaurant meals without information about its origin. Jacek Chabraszewski/Shutterstock

How safe is chicken imported from China? 5 questions answered

China has started exporting cooked chicken meat to the United States. Is it safe to eat? An agriculture extension specialist discusses possible concerns about food safety and contamination.
Sales of electric vehicles are growing fast, especially in Europe. Sopotnicki/Shutterstock.com

How electric vehicles could take a bite out of the oil market

Shifting to plug-in cars wouldn't be enough to max out global oil consumption by 2040. But it could help make that happen if cities pitch in and ride-sharing doesn't crowd out public transportation.
Efforts to combat climate change are making extracting oil from areas like Canada’s tar sands fields more expensive. Emily Beament/PA Wire via AP

Are fossil fuel companies telling investors enough about the risks of climate change?

The Trump administration may reverse a recent push to require oil companies to disclose more information about climate change risks to investors. Is that a good thing?
About 200 convicted illegal immigrants serving their sentences before being deported, in Phoenix. AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File

Trump’s immigration policies will pick up where Obama’s left off

In his first year of office, Trump's immigration policy will likely focus not on building an expensive wall, but rather on the work that earned Obama the nickname 'Deporter in Chief.'
Many seabird species, including the blue petrel (Halobaena caerulea), consume plastic at sea because algae on the plastic produce an odor that resembles their food sources. J.J. Harrison

The oceans are full of plastic, but why do seabirds eat it?

Thousands of seabirds die every year from consuming plastic trash in the oceans. But why do they eat plastic? New research shows that it produces odors that help some species find prey.
Un goût que nous pourrions bientôt oublier. Chris Richmond

Les bananes vont-elles disparaître ?

Toutes les bananes que nous consommons sont issues de la même monoculture, ce qui expose le fruit à de graves épidémies. Mais heureusement, la génétique a plus d’un tour dans son sac.
Efforts to combat climate change are making extracting oil from areas like Canada’s tar sands fields more expensive. Emily Beament/PA Wire via AP

Should oil companies like Exxon be forced to disclose climate change risks?

The SEC and others are pressing Exxon to disclose more climate change risks to investors. But new research suggests shareholders are already pricing in those costs on their own.
Steven Morgan deploys ABLE robots in a swimming pool to test how well their programs simulate larval behavior. University of California, Davis

Underwater robots help scientists see where marine larvae go and how they get there

Most ocean species start out as larvae drifting with currents. Using underwater robots, scientists have found that larvae use swimming motions to affect their course and reach suitable places to grow.
Field tests of flood-tolerant ‘scuba rice.’ International Rice Research Institute/Flickr

Moving beyond pro/con debates over genetically engineered crops

Advocates have argued for years about whether genetically engineered crops are safe to grow and eat. Plant pathologist and geneticist Pamela Ronald calls for a more nuanced discussion.

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