University of Colorado Boulder

At the foot of the Rocky Mountains, the University of Colorado Boulder is nationally recognized as one of only 36 AAU public research universities. Established in 1876, CU Boulder is a Tier 1 public research university with five Nobel laureates, nine MacArthur “genius” fellows and is the No. 1 public university recipient of NASA awards. CU Boulder is a leader in many fields, including aerospace engineering, physics and environmental law. The school partners with many notable federal research labs, including the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). CU Boulder students thrive academically and athletically, with Buff athletes competing in the NCAA Division I Pac-12 conference.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 63 articles

Exercise is recommended as an effective non-opioid strategy for non-cancer pain such as fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. Yet most adults living with chronic pain do not exercise. Or they exercise very little. (Shutterstock)

How exercise can help tackle the opioid crisis

Research shows that exercise offers promise -- as an alternative to prescription opioids -- for relieving chronic pain.
Supporters of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments during a rally Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 in Salt Lake City. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

President Trump’s national monument rollback is illegal and likely to be reversed in court

President Trump signed an order on Dec. 4 to drastically reduce the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments. Four legal experts explain why this action is likely to be reversed.
An Antarctic icebreaker sails past a penguin. But conservationists are still waiting for their own breakthrough. John B. Weller

Why are talks over an East Antarctic marine park still deadlocked?

Australia is among nations calling for a 1 million square km marine park off East Antarctica. But Russia and China remain opposed, and a recent summit yet again failed to seal the deal.
A high school football game in Kapaa, Hawaii on the island of Kauai. Marco Garcia/AP Photo

Is youth football past its prime?

After decades of continuous growth, participation rates have started to decline. What does it mean for the future of the sport?
It appears that whatever factors are constraining genetic potential among less well-off students in the US do not exert a similar influence in Australia. Shutterstock

For Australian students, academic potential still outweighs social circumstances

In the US, differences in school results among poorer children depend more on environment than genes. In Australia, the story is different.
Educafro, a Brazilian black activist movement, protested in 2012 to demand more affirmative action programs for higher education. AP Photo/Eraldo Peres

Affirmative action around the world

'Positive discrimination' policies around the world are on the rise. What might other countries teach the U.S. about attaining racial, economic and gender equality in higher education?
Bears Ears National Monument, Utah. Bob Wick, BLM/Flickr

National monuments: Presidents can create them, but only Congress can undo them

President Trump has ordered a review of national monuments protected by his predecessors, and may try to abolish or shrink some. But four legal experts say that only Congress has that authority.
University students experiment with human-robot interaction and autonomous manipulation, two elements of manufacturing’s future. Nikolaus Correll

To really help US workers, we should invest in robots

Today, the U.S. is leading the robotics revolution. But without timely investment, China will overtake us, and could permanently put Americans out of work.
Trump’s tax returns would tell us a lot about who he is. Lucas Jackson/Reuters

What we can learn from Trump’s $916 million loss

A 1995 tax return shows a net operating loss so large that it raises concerns about whether it was reported properly – and if Trump has been honest about his taxes.
Companies use children’s data to sell them junk food and other products. Cookie image via www.shutterstock.com

How companies learn what children secretly want

When children work on their school assignments, unknown to them, the software they use is busy collecting data. These data are then used for individualized marketing of junk foods and other products.

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