University of Hull

The University of Hull was established in 1927 as England’s 14th university, and has campuses in Hull and Scarborough. The University today is a vibrant and future-oriented institution, recognised for excellence in learning and teaching as well as a commitment to research, enterprise and engagement. The University is known for its friendliness and high student satisfaction as well as the employability of its graduates.

Research and enterprise are core academic activities of the University. Among its most well-known achievements is the development of liquid crystal displays, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. The most recent Research Assessment Exercise revealed that 80% of the University’s submitted research is of international standard in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

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Displaying 181 - 197 of 197 articles

A bear necessity of life. Walt Disney Productions.

Our Jungle Book obsession: two films planned by rival studios

It may seem a little strange to some, but currently there are two rival Jungle Book films planned. Idris Elba is to voice Shere Khan in a Disney remake, potentially along with Scarlett Johansson and Lupita…
Does my £9,000 get me a tablet? BillyONeal

For £9,000, students expect their classes to go digital

Students in the UK are now paying annual fees of up to £9,000 – and they expect more for their money. This is a radical change from the situation a couple of decades ago when student grants provided the…
All these have been improved by crystallography. 2is3

The little-known science that improved everything around us

UNESCO has declared 2014 as the International Year of Crystallography. But why? Quite simply because the science of crystallography has revolutionised how we live – and yet few people know about it. Crystallography…
Crystallography: from a handheld experiment in 1912 to the size of many football fields today. Diamond Light Source

Explainer: what is X-ray crystallography?

Around 100 years ago a father and his son in north England conducted an experiment that would revolutionise the way scientists study molecules. A refined version of their method still remains one of the…
18th century German cranial brace and bit to create holes in the skulls. Wellcome Library

Ten weird and terrifying medical instruments from the past

The UK’s largest medical charity, the Wellcome Trust, has made its vast database of images freely available to all. The collection holds photos of hundreds of years worth of medicine, instruments and scientific…
Larkin about: the people of Hull celebrate their city’s victory. Anna Gowthorpe/PA

Larkin, Ronson and 26 reasons why Hull is UK City of Culture

Kingston-upon-Hull has been named the UK City of Culture for 2017; a spotlight has been thrown on a place that many people either don’t really know much about, sometimes falling prey to typical Home Counties…
Martin Parker

What if water had memory?

Homeopaths believe water has memory. That is how they explain the “medicinal properties” of their concoctions. Apparently people are treated even though the pill or potion may not contain a single molecule…
Brazil could be at risk if the QE money dries up. Owen Humphreys/PA

Not all emerging markets are in the same QE boat

The US Federal Reserve’s surprise decision to continue quantitative easing (QE) was generally well received in those countries with rapidly growing and industrialising economies. They were worried that…
This street could do with taking its own advice. alexliivet

A layer of sunscreen on the street might fight smog

In 2009 a team of academics from Eindhoven University of Technology dug up a perfectly normal street in the Netherlands. In its place they installed a chemistry experiment cunningly disguised as a concrete…
Silicone? In the clear. Owen Humphreys/PA

Cricket finds itself in a hot spot over silicone on bats

The Ashes series is already plagued by controversy over technology’s role in cricket. The latest allegations of equipment tampering haven’t helped. Australian TV station Channel Nine has reported some…
A microscopic version of this kills bacteria. Ed Schipul

Silver bullets kill bacteria, not werewolves or witches

The use of silver in medicine is as old as western medicine itself. Hippocrates is known to have used it to treat ulcers and wounds, the Romans almost certainly knew of its healing properties, its use…
Hopefully this will remain a rare sight. Edgaras Zvirblys

Explainer: what are chemical weapons?

There was chaos on the streets of Halajba in March 1988. In this corner of Iraq, at the time Iraqi Kurdistan, people had suddenly started experiencing cold-like symptoms – tight chest and nasal congestion…
Not so super now. The end may be nigh for Staphylococcus aureus. Wikipedia

Gold, silver and lasers: new weapons for the superbug war

Antibiotics have probably saved more lives than any other form of medication. Prior to their development, things that we now consider trivial, such as a prick from a rose bush or a sore throat, could easily…
Making power-hungry datacentres like these more energy efficient is vital. Schlüsselbein2007/Flickr

Your next computer can be any colour, so long as it’s green

Do you have a computer on a desk somewhere? Fans whirring, screensaver flickering, left on for days. Would you leave your washing machine running for days? Because over time, a desktop computer draws on…

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