University of Hull

The University of Hull has been changing the world and changing lives since 1927. In a rapidly altering world, our research is responding to some of the biggest global challenges. Our current work ranges from health to habitats, food to flooding and supply chains to slavery.

We have appeared twice in Universities UK’s list of ‘100 discoveries by British universities that have changed the world’. Once for our globally renowned breakthrough in liquid crystal displays (facilitating the technology for screens on mobile phones, TVs, laptops and tablets); and once for our pioneering work on a bone density scanner for the earlier detection of osteoporosis. Our Wilberforce Institute has also won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its work combatting modern-day slavery.

We’ve been recognised for our academic impact: the University was named in the top 50 UK institutions for research power by Times Higher Education, based on the most recent Research Excellence Framework 2014.

The University’s collaborations are shaping the future. Building on the success of Hull’s reign as City of Culture, in which the University was a Principal Partner, the University is pleased to be bringing the best of British Science to Hull and the Humber in September 2018 by hosting the British Science Festival, giving the opportunity to showcase nationally the region’s significant contribution in this field.

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Displaying 181 - 200 of 227 articles

Ready for brekkie. warriorpoet

What does Spider-Man eat for breakfast?

While stuck in a hotel room I got sucked into watching the 2002 Spider-Man movie. And it struck me that Peter Parker must have an enormously high-protein diet to generate all that spider silk he goes through…
Cameron’s long term economic plan involves more debt and deficit. Peter Byrne/PA Wire

The UK cannot ‘live within its means’ under David Cameron

In the first of a series of keynote speeches Prime Minister David Cameron identified the central theme of the Conservative Party’s 2015 general election manifesto: “to get Britain back to living within…
Ok, that’s not the way to extract it. fabriceh_com

How scorpion venom could yield new cancer treatment

In the development of new drugs, taking something from nature and modifying it has been a successful tactic employed by medicinal chemists for years. Now, with the help of nanotechnology, researchers are…
Butterflies aren’t the only ones with snazzy stripes. Ben Sale

Coming out of the closet: why I will always love moths

Ask people to describe what they associate with butterflies, and you will probably get an image of a sunny summer’s day, with a beautiful peacock drifting gently on the cooling breeze. Ask the same question…
This lot survived rapid global warming – so why can’t we? Jay Matternes / Smithsonian Museum

Sudden global warming 55m years ago was much like today

It is often said that humans have caused the Earth to warm at an unprecedented rate. However researchers have discovered another period, some 55m years ago, when massive volcanic eruptions pumped so much…
Did Brown really build Britain’s future? EPA

Was the Gordon Brown government really that bad?

In the week Gordon Brown announced he will stand down from his Westminster constituency at the May 2015 general election, two central observations come to mind. From the Brown government to its Cameron-Clegg…
The cat approves. Michel Filion

Five ways to keep your home warm this winter

If you live in a poorly insulated home, and many of us do, you could spend thousands this winter on energy bills. But our ancestors had many ways to keep snug at little or no cost. Now, thanks to modern…
It’s all science. Emmanuel Hebrard

Explainer: what Philae did in its 60 hours on Comet 67P

The drama of Philae’s slow fall, bounce and unfortunate slide into hibernation was one of the most thrilling science stories of a generation. But what in its short 60 hours of life on Comet 67P did it…

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