University of Manchester

The University of Manchester, a member of the prestigious Russell Group, is the UK’s largest single-site university and is consistently ranked among the world’s elite for graduate employability.

The University is also one of the country’s major research institutions, rated fifth in the UK in terms of ‘research power’ (REF 2014). World class research is carried out across a diverse range of fields including cancer, advanced materials, addressing global inequalities, energy and industrial biotechnology.

No fewer than 25 Nobel laureates have either worked or studied there.

It is the only UK university to have social responsibility among its core strategic objectives, with staff and students alike dedicated to making a positive difference in communities around the world.

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Foreign Minister Julie Bishop, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg announce plans to ratify the Paris climate deal, which could be severely weakened by a US change of heart. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Australia to ratify the Paris climate deal, under a large Trump-shaped shadow

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has announced plans to ratify the Paris climate agreement, a day after US participation in the treaty was thrown into dought by Donald Trump's election victory.
We thought Malcolm Turnbull had nailed his colours to the mast on climate policy - but maybe not. AAP Image/Joel Carrett

Another prime minister, another endorsement for coal – but why?

Malcolm Turnbull has said coal will be important for "many decades to come" – joining a long line of prime ministers who talked big on climate policy but found themselves talking up fossil fuels.
Australian wind energy has been under a cloud for much of its decades-long history. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Attacks on renewable energy policy are older than the climate issue itself

Skirmishes over funding for renewable energy research are just the latest battle in a saga that stretches back to the early 1980s – years before the public became widely aware of the climate threat.
Senator Ian Macdonald, pictured here speaking against the carbon tax in 2014, has since described human-induced climate change as “farcical and fanciful”. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

How climate denial gained a foothold in the Liberal Party, and why it still won’t go away

After fighting the 1990 election on a stronger climate platform than Labor, the following two decades saw an ebb and flow of climate scepticism in the Liberal Party, which still continues today.
Prime Minister Bob Hawke opening the General Assembly of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Perth, November 1990. National Archives of Australia

Cabinet papers 1990-91: déjà vu? We’re having the same debate about climate as we were then

The National Archives of Australia today released selected federal cabinet records for 1990 and 1991. They reveal intense battles over Australia's domestic climate targets and, above all, a palpable determination that Australia not damage its coal revenue.

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