University of Manitoba

The University of Manitoba has thrived for 140 years as a place where students come to learn, be inspired and find their voice. We are Manitoba’s largest, most comprehensive university and its only research-intensive post-secondary institution. Our research facilities foster collaboration and scholarship in areas including Arctic system science and climate change; immunity, inflammation and infectious disease; population and global health; culture and creative works; and Indigenous research.

At the U of M we are taking our place among leading universities through a commitment to transformative research and scholarship, and innovative teaching and learning, uniquely strengthened by Indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 30 articles

It’s time to seriously rethink giving tax breaks for charitable donations, since ultimately taxpayers foot the bill for the deductions anyway. (Shutterstock)

Donating to charities shouldn’t result in tax breaks

Several countries — namely Austria, Finland, Ireland, Italy, Sweden and Switzerland — have removed tax benefits for charitable donations. Here's why Canada should follow suit.
Se mettre en forme et mieux manger font partie des obsessions de notre société, relayées par nos gouvernements, les médias et l'industrie du divertissement. (Unsplash/ Mārtiņš Zemlickis)

Pourquoi courez-vous?

Pourquoi l'exercice et l'alimentation prennent autant de place ? Pourquoi la minceur est-elle devenue une vertu et le surpoids, son contraire ? Il faut chercher du côté du message que la société envoie.
The idea that fat is lazy and thin is virtuous has its roots in Christianity and is perpetuated by industry and media today. (Unsplash/ Mārtiņš Zemlickis)

Why you resolved to get thinner and fitter this year

Moralistic talk about food, exercise and bodies has its roots in Christianity and is perpetuated by corporations. Collectively, we can resist.
How much judges are paid is a thorny issue for governments. It shouldn’t be. Rawpixel/Unsplash

Why politics shouldn’t influence how much we pay judges

Secure and appropriate compensation for judges is a constitutionally recognized component of judicial independence. Here's why politics must not be allowed to interfere with it.
In this 2012 photo, grandmother Janet Kitheka, 63, collects her adopted “granddaughter” Lucy, 13, at the end of the school day in the yard of the Hot Courses Primary School, in the village of Nyumbani which caters to children who lost their parents to HIV, and grandparents who lost their children to HIV in Kenya. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Aspirin could help reduce HIV infections in women

Research shows that Aspirin could reduce the number of HIV infections in women at high risk for HIV, such as Kenyan female sex workers.
Canadians are up in arms about Statistics Canada’s push for their financial data. They shouldn’t be. (Shutterstock)

In defence of Statistics Canada’s request for financial data

Statistics Canada has been tone-deaf in its push for the financial data of Canadians from banks, but that data is essential to forming good public policy.
Successful therapy involves collaboration. Both therapist and client work at maintaining a positive relationship and need to continuously respond and adjust to the other. (Shutterstock)

The surprising secret to successful psychotherapy

Therapy works. But success has little to do with your therapist’s experience, gender, graduate degree, or even the school of therapy they practise.
Animals in the western Arctic have higher levels of mercury in their bodies than those in the eastern Arctic. (Shutterstock)

How we solved an Arctic mercury mystery

A new study demystifies regional differences in mercury levels in marine animals in the Canadian Arctic.
Canadian troops arrive to a UN base in Gao, Mali, on in June 2018, amid an insurgency by jihadist and ethnic rebel groups. Canada has yet to impose sanctions on the African country because it lacks names to target for asset freezes and other measures. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s growing challenges with economic sanctions

The federal government has set aside $22.2 million to develop and co-ordinate sanctions while educating Canadians about their obligations. Where to start is the first question.
In this November 2017 photo, unemployed Dave Cherkewski discusses how he was helped by Ontario’s basic income pilot project. (AP Photo/Rob Gillies)

The cancellation of Ontario’s basic income project is a tragedy

The cancellation of Ontario’s basic income pilot not only violates our ethical obligations to participants. It also means forfeiting a valuable research opportunity on income security.
Refugee Journeys is a board game designed to help front-line workers and educators confront their bias towards refugees. Michelle Lam

Playing this board game will challenge your ideas about refugees

Many Canadians have volunteered to help newcomers adjust to society. This board game was developed to help these volunteers understand what it feels like to enter a new country and build a new life.
Canadian Lt. Gen. Pierre St-Amand is seen on Parliament Hill in September 2017 where he appeared as a witness at a House of Commons national defence committee. The deputy commander of NORAD said North American defence needs to evolve to meet modern threats. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

NORAD’s struggle for relevance on its 60th birthday

NORAD is celebrating its 60th anniversary this May. New challenges face Canada and the U.S. now and in the coming years. How will NORAD evolve?
Canola, the first ‘made-in-Canada’ crop, was a product of university research and became a huge economic boon to the country. In this 2016 photo, riders and their horses pass through a canola field near Cremona, Alta. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

In search of another canola: How to capitalize on Canadian research

Canola is an example of an innovation that sprung from university research and became a major economic boon to Canada. It should be happening more often.
Members of the police SWAT team gather outside a small apartment building in Montréal in 2009. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Rise of the SWAT team: Routine police work in Canada is now militarized

The deployments of SWAT teams by public police for routine police activities have risen in major Canadian cities. This militarization will likely fall disproportionately on those from minority groups.
Parenting programs and home visiting programs can offer vital support to mothers struggling with mental illness, substance use, and other challenges. Research shows that avoiding foster care is better for the health of mother and child. (Shutterstock)

Foster care damages the health of mothers

New research shows that having a child in foster care is often harmful to a mother's mental and physical health.

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