University of Manitoba

The University of Manitoba has thrived for 140 years as a place where students come to learn, be inspired and find their voice. We are Manitoba’s largest, most comprehensive university and its only research-intensive post-secondary institution. Our research facilities foster collaboration and scholarship in areas including Arctic system science and climate change; immunity, inflammation and infectious disease; population and global health; culture and creative works; and Indigenous research.

At the U of M we are taking our place among leading universities through a commitment to transformative research and scholarship, and innovative teaching and learning, uniquely strengthened by Indigenous knowledge and perspectives.

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Canadian troops arrive to a UN base in Gao, Mali, on in June 2018, amid an insurgency by jihadist and ethnic rebel groups. Canada has yet to impose sanctions on the African country because it lacks names to target for asset freezes and other measures. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s growing challenges with economic sanctions

The federal government has set aside $22.2 million to develop and co-ordinate sanctions while educating Canadians about their obligations. Where to start is the first question.
In this November 2017 photo, unemployed Dave Cherkewski discusses how he was helped by Ontario’s basic income pilot project. (AP Photo/Rob Gillies)

The cancellation of Ontario’s basic income project is a tragedy

The cancellation of Ontario’s basic income pilot not only violates our ethical obligations to participants. It also means forfeiting a valuable research opportunity on income security.
Refugee Journeys is a board game designed to help front-line workers and educators confront their bias towards refugees. Michelle Lam

Playing this board game will challenge your ideas about refugees

Many Canadians have volunteered to help newcomers adjust to society. This board game was developed to help these volunteers understand what it feels like to enter a new country and build a new life.
Canadian Lt. Gen. Pierre St-Amand is seen on Parliament Hill in September 2017 where he appeared as a witness at a House of Commons national defence committee. The deputy commander of NORAD said North American defence needs to evolve to meet modern threats. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

NORAD’s struggle for relevance on its 60th birthday

NORAD is celebrating its 60th anniversary this May. New challenges face Canada and the U.S. now and in the coming years. How will NORAD evolve?
Canola, the first ‘made-in-Canada’ crop, was a product of university research and became a huge economic boon to the country. In this 2016 photo, riders and their horses pass through a canola field near Cremona, Alta. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

In search of another canola: How to capitalize on Canadian research

Canola is an example of an innovation that sprung from university research and became a major economic boon to Canada. It should be happening more often.
Members of the police SWAT team gather outside a small apartment building in Montréal in 2009. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Rise of the SWAT team: Routine police work in Canada is now militarized

The deployments of SWAT teams by public police for routine police activities have risen in major Canadian cities. This militarization will likely fall disproportionately on those from minority groups.
Parenting programs and home visiting programs can offer vital support to mothers struggling with mental illness, substance use, and other challenges. Research shows that avoiding foster care is better for the health of mother and child. (Shutterstock)

Foster care damages the health of mothers

New research shows that having a child in foster care is often harmful to a mother's mental and physical health.
There is no research evidence that spanking improves child behaviour. On the contrary, spanking is associated with aggression, antisocial behaviour, mental health problems and negative relationships with parents.

Why parents should never spank children

The debate on spanking is over. Scientific studies consistently show that it is harmful to children, increasing the likelihood of mental health problems and antisocial behaviours.
Biomedical engineering involves the application of engineering solutions to medical problems. Employment in the field is projected to grow 23 per cent from 2014 to 2024. (Shutterstock)

A war made me realize: The world needs biomedical engineers

One professor explains how war in Iran led her to a career in biomedical engineering - a rapidly growing field that offers students exciting opportunities to serve humanity.
Dr. Zahra Moussavi tests a device that stimulates the brain with magnetic pulses. The experimental technology can temporarily roll back effects of Alzheimer’s disease. (Zahra Moussavi)

Experimental brain technology can rewind Alzheimer’s disease

When Zahra Moussavi's mother developed Alzheimer's, the scientist pursued a technology that directly stimulates the brain with electromagnets to mitigate the effects of the disease. It worked.
General anesthetics affect cellular proteins to knock us out. Some do so better than others, especially the noble gas Xenon. (Shutterstock)

Science lesson: How anesthetics work, and why xenon’s perfect

How do anesthetics work, and what makes for an ideal anesthetic? It's not as mysterious as once believed, and there's a gas that ticks all the boxes for a perfect anesthetic: xenon.
New research suggests that members of ethnic minorities like advertising that features ethnic minorities – but only their own. (Shutterstock)

Do minorities prefer ads with white people?

Visible minority consumers prefer advertising that features white models to advertising that feature models from other ethnic minority groups. Why?
Tiny hairs cover the bodies of honeybees — including this one dusted in pollen — that allow them to detect molecular “fingerprints” similar to how home security sensors work. (Shutterstock)

How home security resembles dancing honeybees

Bees and home security cameras use the same complex techniques to monitor their environments.
The manuscript of ‘Memoirs of Sir Isaac Newton’ shows the words ‘does this apple fall?’ Newton’s curiosity about the falling piece of fruit helped him develop the theory of gravity. (AP Photo/Lucy Young)

No new Einsteins to emerge if science funding snubs curiosity

Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein would have bridled under today's research funding bureaucracy. It's time to allow scientists to indulge their curiosity again.
Despite his presidential victory, Donald Trump’s business brand is suffering, as is that of his daughter, Ivanka. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumps show how damaged personal brands can harm the business

The Trump brand has taken a hit since Donald Trump won the U.S. presidency. The mistake? Failing to separate the businesses from the personalities.
Primates - human and non-human - can be infected by Ebola. Chris Huh

First Ebola antibody treatment to halt deadly virus in primates

As viruses go, Ebola is one that strikes particular fear. It’s infectious and four out of the five identified strains can cause severe hemorrhagic fever, which in later stages leads to bleeding from the…

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