University of Maryland, Baltimore County

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Displaying 61 - 80 of 84 articles

On the rebound: a number of cities, including Chicago, are becoming magnets for a growing number of professionals. Jamie McCaffrey/flickr

Cities are booming but progress is uneven and, to some, too costly

After a period of decline, cities around the world are revitalizing but it's coming at a cost: an increasingly tight affordable housing squeeze.
So many Chinese immigrants have come to Vancouver, it’s been nicknamed Hongcouver. isabelle_puaut/flickr

The other immigrants: how the super-rich skirt quotas and closed borders

Immigration policies for people fleeing poverty or civil unrest dominate the news, but there's been a huge rise in wealthy migrants to the West. Are these "cash for citizenship" programs worth it?
Chicago has encouraged green roofs to reduce water runoff and energy consumption in buildings. Sookie/flickr

Why cities are a rare good news story in climate change

Mayors from the around the world are at the Vatican to discuss climate change, a global issue that's proving to be most effectively addressed at the local level.
The Grand Review of the Union Armies May 1865 Library of Congress

Remembering Sherman’s Army

The story of the Grand Review of the Union Armies in May 1865 and of the veterans of Sherman's March who believed that it was their campaign that helped bring the Civil War to its end.
Nepalese soldiers unload food supplies at an army base in Chautara, Nepal, April 29 2015. Olivia Harris/Reuters

What works and doesn’t in disaster health response

Research suggests that many international health-oriented responses are poorly targeted. So what kind of health response would best target the needs of the Nepalese?
Demonstrators attempt to keep protests calm during Baltimore demonstrations. REUTERS/Jim Bourg

Baltimore riots: the fire this time and the fire last time and the time between

A panel of scholars comments on the origins and the implications of the violence in Baltimore.
Packed but greener than many: The mass transit system in Delhi contributes to its lower-than-average carbon footprint ranking. Stephan Rebernik

How green is your city: towards an index of urban sustainability

Emerging research looks at new ways to measure the ecological footprint of cities, a key step to making them more environmentally benign and perhaps more livable.
Through his music, Lead Belly rejected the stereotype that country music was the domain of white artists, while blues music was reserved for blacks. Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives

Lead Belly’s music defied racial categorization

Lead Belly: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection depicts the fully-formed artist – a blues musician, yes, but also a performer of string-band, country and pop songs.
A number of snow storms have led schools to declare snow days. Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P./Flickr

Schools close and kids lose

A school year of less than 180 days is detrimental to kids’ learning. The most disadvantaged kids lose the most when schools have to declare snow days.

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