University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: • Economic and Management Sciences • Education • Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology • Health Sciences • Humanities • Law • Natural and Agricultural Sciences • Theology • Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) • the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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A street trader looks out from his store in Cape Town, South Africa. Defining people who earn US$2 a day as middle class doesn’t make sense. EPA/Nic Bothma

Africa’s rising middle class: time to sort out fact from fiction

Some economists have touted the rising middle class as a panacea for Africa's challenges. But a more realistic diagnosis of what makes up a middle class is needed.
A sign banning selfie sticks in an Osaka train station in Japan. Reuters/Thomas White

The deadly selfie game – the thrill to end all thrills

In 2015 more people around the world died while taking selfies than were killed by sharks. Many tourist landmarks have banned the taking of selfies and selfie sticks to prevent untimely accidents.
Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn greets US President Barack Obama on his arrival in Ethiopia. Reuters/Tiksa Negeri

How US aid to Africa has changed in the wake of China’s growing influence

Between 1995 and 2013 the US provided about US$98 billion in aid to sub-Saharan Africa. But the country's economic and political reach is slowly declining.
Crowds cheer as Zimbabwe’s President Robert Mugabe arrives to address the country’s Independence Day celebrations in Harare. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

What Africa’s most newly independent states did with 22 years of freedom

Namibia's new elite has used "affirmative action" for self-enrichment, while the majority of the population remains excluded from its the wealth. Meanwhile, Zimbabwe's socio-economic woes continue.
China’s President Xi Jinping on a state visit to Zimbabwe. REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo

How and why China became Africa’s biggest aid donor

The increasing importance of non-traditional donors such as China has meant that the economic and political stronghold of Western countries in sub-Sahara Africa has gradually ebbed.
Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe and his wife Grace. Mugabe has been in power since 1980. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

How liberators turn into oppressors: a study of southern African states

It is normal for resistance movements to adopt rough survival strategies and techniques while fighting an oppressive regime. Unfortunately that culture takes root and is permanently nurtured.
South Africa’s Finance Minister, Pravin Gordhan, left, chats with Lesetja Kganyago, Governor of the Reserve Bank of South Africa. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

South Africa faces difficult times, but disaster is not inevitable

Pessimists aren't asking if the glass in South Africa is half full. They want to know if there's anything in the glass. The answer is a pleasant surprise.
Organisations like the African Union must find a way to monitor countries' environmental commitments. Shutterstock

How Africa can up its game to meet environmental challenges

Africa has fewer resources than others when it comes to climate change adaptation. For this reason environmental agreements must be monitored by the likes of the AU.
A South African university student references the Oscar Pistorius trial during a fee protest. Kim Ludbrook/EPA

Perpetual bonds can help open universities to all who qualify

It shouldn't be up to universities or the government alone to fund students who qualify for tertiary education but can't afford it. A perpetual bond system could be the answer.
A student beats the statue of Cecil John Rhodes with a belt as it is removed from the University of Cape Town. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

Colonial legacy of mining pioneers poses a dilemma for South Africans

The Randlords left a big dilemma in their wake: contemporary South Africa is not sure whether to thank them for bringing civilisation, or to curse them for complicating future race relations.
Electricity pylons from Cape Town’s Koeberg nuclear power plant. State-owned companies help to provide infrastructure for economic development. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

The secret to successful state-owned enterprises is how they’re run

State-owned companies are not generally needed to provide goods. Rather, they are needed to provide the foundation for a well-functioning economy and a healthy, well-informed populace.

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