University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: • Economic and Management Sciences • Education • Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology • Health Sciences • Humanities • Law • Natural and Agricultural Sciences • Theology • Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) • the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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Voters wait their turn outside a polling station at Nkonjeni village in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The country is gearing up for local elections. Reuters/Radu Sigheti

Opposition aims for upset in South Africa’s high-stakes election

The opposition Democratic Alliance is hopeful that the African National Congress will fail to win a majority in three metros. This will open the door for it to rule in coalition with smaller parties.
Hawkers sell goods on the streets of Zimbabwe’s capital, Harare. Imports of bottled water from South Africa have been banned. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

Lessons to be learnt from Zimbabwe’s blunt use of an import ban

The control of imported goods is a quick fix that doesn't resolve fundamental economic problems. It must be accompanied by a policy focus on macroeconomic issues, labour and agriculture.
Nigeria is one of the countries in Africa that has a serious air pollution problem. Reuters

Why it’s time Africa features in global plans to manage air pollution

Africa has largely been ignored when it comes to official global air quality programmes. Yet low-income countries like many of those in Africa are particularly affected by air pollution.
Idyllic Mauritius is the only African country ranked in the favourable category of ‘more stable’ in the latest survey on state fragility. Reuters/Darrin Zammit Lupi

Is the Fragile States Index ‘fatally flawed’?

The Fragile States Index leaves more questions than it answers. Like similar global surveys, its credibility hinges on reliable data. But how sound are its statistics and their interpretation?
Professor Chabani Manganyi reflects on his time working as a black psychologist in the heart of the apartheid era. Supplied

Apartheid and the making of a black psychologist

In the heart of South Africa's apartheid era, Professor Chabani Manganyi was among a handful of black psychologists offering expert testimony in the country's courts.
Baby Lurky, whose family was displaced by Boko Haram in the northeast region of Nigeria, sleeps at a camp in Adamawa State. Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde

Nigeria’s constitution holds the key to protecting internally displaced people

The rise in the number of people fleeing Boko Haram terror calls for urgent amendments to Nigeria's constitution to provide legal protection to the country's millions of internally displaced citizens.
Outgoing UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s successor faces the challenge of making the organisation more accountable. UN

What can be done to stop the United Nations abusing its immunity

The ‘functional immunity’ granted to UN officials made good sense when the body was founded after World War II. But as its organisational functions have expanded, so has this immunity.
Some dolphins live close to the shore, where they regularly encounter humans. This is affecting their numbers. Simon Elwen

How insight into southern Africa’s dolphins is being deepened

Globally, a quarter of whale and dolphin species are endangered. Though South African dolphin populations are generally in good heath, the humpback dolphin is cause for concern.
A street trader looks out from his store in Cape Town, South Africa. Defining people who earn US$2 a day as middle class doesn’t make sense. EPA/Nic Bothma

Africa’s rising middle class: time to sort out fact from fiction

Some economists have touted the rising middle class as a panacea for Africa's challenges. But a more realistic diagnosis of what makes up a middle class is needed.

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