University of South Australia

Founded in 1991, the University of South Australia is committed to educating professionals, creating and applying knowledge, engaging communities, maintaining cultural diversity among its staff and students, and providing equitable access to education.

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Iron is contained in many vegetarian foods, and there are yummy ways to enhance how much you absorb. Shutterstock/Uber Images

Why iron is such an important part of your diet

Iron deficiency affects more than one in ten Australian women before they reach menopause. Better dietary choices can be part of the solution.
This interactive body map highlights the health risks associated with inactivity.

Interactive body map: physical inactivity and the risks to your health

Being physically inactive has been shown to significantly increase the risk of many causes of death and disease. This interactive body map highlights the links between physical inactivity and disease.
Tackling antimicrobial resistance relies on us tackling the interrelated areas of human, animal and environmental health. from www.shutterstock.com

Why the health and agriculture sectors need to work together to stop antibiotic resistance

The federal government is tackling antimicrobial resistance with a 'One Health' approach. But what is One Health and what can it offer that other approaches haven't?
Policies and services designed to protect Aboriginal children’s cultural connections are not being properly implemented. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Australia failing to safeguard cultural connections for Aboriginal children in out-of-home care

New reports show a widespread lack of care for the cultural needs of many of the 19,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in child protection and out-of-home care.
For viruses like dengue, being injected with the pathogen as in a vaccine can open the door to secondary infections. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Explainer: what are antibodies and why are viruses like dengue worse the second time?

Our immune system protects us but when it comes to some mosquito-borne disease, it can work against us. What are the implications for the development of a Zika virus vaccine?
Evidence supports a review of dietary guidelines around the ideal balance of omega 6 to omega 3 dietary fats. Shutterstock/Uber Images

Why Australian dietary recommendations on fat need to change

A prominent new paper reflects growing global sentiment amongst scientists and dieticians to review advice relating to the types of dietary fats we should consume for optimal health.
The logic is that violence is a choice, so men can be reasonably expected to stop. luxorphoto/Shutterstock

To stop domestic violence, we need to change perpetrators’ behaviour

Thousands of Australian men are sitting on waiting lists every year to get help to end their violent behaviour – even though behaviour change programs can reduce their likelihood of offending again.
Australia is getting better at encouraging people to consider a startup. Image sourced from Shutterstock.com

It takes a community to raise a startup

Australia is still far too 'arms-length' from the process of starting and growing companies.
The rear of 30-32 Oxford Street, an area of Sydney affected by an outbreak of bubonic plague in 1900. Wikimedia/NSW State Archives

Why 100 years without slum housing in Australia is coming to an end

New research finds almost a million Australians are living in poor or very poor-quality housing, with more than 100,000 in dwellings regarded as very poor or derelict.
Clean water and access to food are two of the most priceless ecosystem services.

Without action, Asia-Pacific ecosystems could lose a third of their value by 2050

Current land-use patterns could see the value of 'ecosystem services' – the natural processes that sustain life – plummet by mid-century. But with the right policies we can turn this trend around.
The bodies of Olympic athletes are becoming more specialised, more differentiated – and much more extreme. Reuters/Max Rossi

Survival of the fittest: the changing shapes and sizes of Olympic athletes

Over time, the body sizes and shapes of Olympians have been moving apart from each other at light-speed, and have become increasingly specialised and differentiated.

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