University of Toronto

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto has one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in depth and breadth on any other Canadian campus.

With more than 75,000 students across three campuses (St. George, Mississauga and Scarborough) and over 450,000 alumni active in every region of the world, U of T’s influence is felt in every area of human endeavour.

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Displaying 61 - 80 of 245 articles

Making preschool free will dramatically improve affordability for families across Ontario, Canada, and lead to a predicted increase of 40,000 parents in full-time employment. (Shutterstock)

Why free preschool makes the most sense for families

It is vital that Ontario's child-care reforms reach all families, and that the province learns from mistakes made in Quebec.
Stacks of used clothing are seen in this African warehouse. The U.S. is retaliating against countries that are restricting the import of American used clothing, a marginal industry for the U.S. but a critical one for some African nations. (Shutterstock)

America’s petty policy on used clothes for Africa

The top U.S. foreign policy goals in Africa evidently no longer relate to human rights or democratic freedoms, but to protecting tiny, marginal American industries.
Thousands of people are dying every year of opioid-related overdoses, in an epidemic that traces its roots to 1996 and the introduction of the prescription drug OxyContin. Here, prescription opioids are shown in Toronto during 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy

How Big Pharma deceives you about drug safety

Prescription drugs are policed by industry and Health Canada has never prosecuted a drug company for illegally marketing a drug.
One of the authors speaking at the 2017 March for Science. Emily Darling

Stand up for science: More researchers now see engagement as a crucial part of their job

Four scientists talk through the ways they now build outreach into their work as a way to spread their research's impact – something that wasn't the norm for past generations of academics.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in an armchair discussion highlighting the federal budget’s investments in Canadian innovation at the University of Ottawa in March 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Made by humans: A recipe for innovation

Where and how do we learn to innovate? Our parents can’t teach us. Our bosses are trying to learn alongside us. Even post-secondary courses only provide us with the basics. Follow this recipe.
We love to take personality tests, but is it time to think more about the corporate interests behind them? (Shutterstock)

Our ongoing love-hate relationship with personality tests

Personality tests played a central role in the recent Facebook scandal over corporate harvesting of personal data. Why are businesses so interested in them?
Gerald Stanley enters the courthouse in Battleford, Sask., in February 2018 during his trial in the death of Colten Boushie, an Indigenous man. The use by Stanley’s defence team of peremptory challenges produced an all-white jury in his trial. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

A good first step towards diverse, impartial Canadian juries

The Canadian government's criminal justice bill would abolish what are known as peremptory challenges. Here's why that's long overdue.
A 2018 pilot project between the Public Health Agency of Canada and Advanced Symbolics will use social media posts as a resource to predict regional suicide rates. (Shutterstock)

How AI is helping to predict and prevent suicides

From predicting suicide risk to chatbot therapy, artificial intelligence is all the rage in suicide prevention. The question is, can it really work?
People participate in a Women’s March in Toronto in January 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Canadian professors still face a gender pay gap

The gender pay gap at Canadian universities cannot be explained away as the holdover from discrimination of long ago. It's high time universities valued male and female professors equally.
There are currently no effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, which causes may elders to live their last years without recognizing their loved ones, and unable to care for themselves. (Shutterstock)

Can the healthy brain offer clues to curing Alzheimer’s?

Study of the "memory centres" of the brain in adults offers hope for detecting Alzheimer's disease earlier -- before the onset of memory loss.
Could universal pharmacare reduce excessive drug price hikes in Canada? Eric Hoskins, former Ontario Minister of Health, will chair a federal government advisory council to implement a national pharmacare plan. Hoskins is pictured here with federal Minister of Health Ginette Petitpas Taylor. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Pharmacare and the chaotic world of Canadian drug prices

The cost of a life-saving drug in Canada is rising by 3,000 per cent. A national pharmacare plan could bring order to this chaotic world of Canadian drug prices.
Some of Hollywood’s greatest movies have never won an Academy Award. But there’s an indication that critically acclaimed movies are now being recognized with Oscar nominations. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)

Three trends to watch at the Oscars this weekend

Throughout its history, the Academy Awards has picked some questionable winning films. But there are signs the Oscars are more often recognizing quality filmmaking.
Jean-Yves Duclos, Canada’s minister of Families, Children and Social Development, plays with children at a licensed YMCA daycare in downtown Toronto on March 29, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim)

Will Ontario child-care dollars come with a commitment to quality and safety?

Until all child care facilities are licensed -- and required to undergo criminal record checks, fire safety inspections and first aid training -- children will continue to die.

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