University of Victoria

The University of Victoria is more than a top research university in a spectacular West Coast location. We’re a university of achievement, a university of curiosity, a university of integrated learning, and so much more.

UVic is ranked #11 globally and first in Canada among universities less than 50 years old by Times Higher Education (THE). It also ranks in THE’s elite global list of the top 200 universities, which includes approximately one per cent of the world’s best institutions.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 24 articles

Une équipe de thérapeutes a déposé une demande auprès de Santé Canada afin d’obtenir, dans le cadre d’une psychothérapie, le droit d’administrer de la psilocybine à des patients atteints d’un cancer en phase terminale. Shutterstock

Et si les drogues psychédéliques pouvaient révolutionner votre fin de vie?

La recherche démontre que la psilocybine thérapeutique est sûre et efficace contre l'anxiété et la dépression en fin de vie. Son interdiction viole-t-elle notre droit à "la vie, la liberté et la sécurité ?"
People living with HIV/AIDS all over the world are still struggling with stigma due to perceptions of the virus as dark and shameful. Here a Filipino man lights candles at a World AIDS Day even in Quezon city, Philippines in 2016. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

What you need to know about HIV/AIDS today

Researchers from the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS share the latest research on HIV prevention, treatment and stigma.
A team of Canadian therapists have filed an application with Health Canada seeking permission to provide psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy to patients with terminal cancer. (Shutterstock)

What if psychedelics could revolutionize the way you die?

Research shows therapeutic psilocybin to be a safe and effective antidote to end-of-life anxiety and depression. Does prohibition therefore violate our right to "life, liberty and security?"
Suncor’s base plant with upgraders in the oil sands in Fort McMurray Alta., June 13, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson)

How post-truth politics is sinking debate on environmental assessment reform

Canada's proposed new environmental assessment law is facing heated, if not necessarily well-informed, opposition. The real question is whether it goes far enough.
A promotional photo for the release of Skygge’s first album ‘Hello World.’ Jean Francois Robert

AI’s first pop album ushers in a new musical era

AI and human musical collaborations have been around since the 60s, but for the first time, we are hearing AI "pop" music: can AI actually create creative and emotionally engaging music?
Debates over the history of colonialism have sparked controversies on university campuses in recent years, as illustrated by the removal of a statue honoring Cecil Rhodes at the University of Cape Town in 2015. Desmond Bowles

Genocide hoax tests ethics of academic publishing

Would an academic work that makes a case for genocide be fair game for publication, or is it beyond the ethical bounds of legitimate scholarly debate?
The free speech wars rage on but there is an essential difference between free speech and hate speech. Words shape the way we think about the world. (Jason Rosewell/Unsplash)

Anarchist professor takes on hate speech

Most Canadians are more than happy to support free speech, believing it to be the foundation of democracy. But for speech to be free it must be aligned to freedom itself.
Previous plans to adapt Blood Meridian had envisioned casting Vincent D'Onofrio as “judge Holden.” (You Tube)

The unfilmable ‘Blood Meridian’

Blood Meridian, Cormac McCarthy’s famous novel, may be unfilmable – not because of its gruesome violent tale of U.S. imperialism in the Southwest, but because its religious vision is terrifying.
Colten Boushie’s uncle Alvin Baptiste raises an eagle’s wing as demonstrators gather outside of the courthouse in North Battleford, Sask., on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Matt Smith

The myth of the Wheat King and the killing of Colten Boushie

In the acquittal of Gerald Stanley we must remember how one-sided systematic remembering in Canada has been. We must remember how Canadian-state law created the myth of the homesteader as Wheat King.
Loyalty to the British Empire is taught to these second and third generation Japanese children in an Internment Camp in British Columbia circa 1942. (CP PHOTO/Jack Long National Archives of Canada C-067492)

300 letters of outrage from Japanese Canadians who lost their homes

Recently, 300 protest letters written by Japanese Canadians in the 1940s were reopened. The letters convey a deep sense of loss, injustice and outrage by Japanese Canadians who lost their homes.
Jodie Foster in Contact. Google Images

‘Contact’ and Carl Sagan’s faith

It is the 20th aniversary of Carl Sagan's sci-fi film, Contact - and a great time to celebrate its legacy and revisit its main premise of Science vs. Religion.
It’s a bird… It’s a plane… No, it’s an object from another solar system! Astronomers have been scrambling to identify a mysterious object passing through our solar system at a speed of about 160,000 km/h. This NASA file image shows a simulation of asteroids passing the earth. (Handout)

How scientists discovered our first interstellar mystery visitor

Astronomers have detected what is believed to be the first interstellar object ever seen passing through our solar system.
Nearly one-third of tropical animal species face extinction if humans do not curb our growing appetites for beef, pork and other land-intensive meats. The Panamanian golden frog bred by the Vancouver Aquarium in this 2014 file photo may be extinct in its natural habitat. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How changing your diet could save animals from extinction

As much as one-third of animal species in the tropics could be eradicated if their habitats continue to be converted for monoculture farming. We can all do something to make a difference.
Thalidomide was used by the pregnant women – the population that turned out to be most vulnerable to its risks. Reuters pictures

Why did thalidomide’s makers ignore warnings about their drug?

Thalidomide's manufacturer, Chemie Grünenthal, marketed the drug as safe for pregnant women despite reports it was causing malformations in newborns. Why such blatant denial?
The April 2015 earthquake flattened villages and towns, but more may be to come. AAP Image/Jonathan Hyams/Save The Children

Nepal earthquake may have ‘unzipped’ fault line, boosting risk of future quake

New research shows the earthquake that struck central Nepal in April this year was only a partial rupture of the fault line, meaning another strong quake could be due in future.

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