Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University is a private research university of about 6,500 undergraduates and 5,300 graduate and professional students. The university comprises 10 schools, a distinguished medical center, a public policy center and The Freedom Forum First Amendment Center.

Vanderbilt offers undergraduate programs in the liberal arts and sciences, engineering, music, education and human development as well as a full range of graduate and professional degrees.

The university is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s top 20 universities by publications such as U.S. News & World Report, with several programs and disciplines ranking in the top 10.

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Scientists are now using evolution to create designer proteins for therapies and industrial processes. Johan Jarnestad / The Royal Academy of Sciences

2018 Nobel Prize for chemistry goes to scientists who learned to ‘hack’ evolution in the lab

Nature doesn't always make the things we need so three Nobel Prize winners figured out how to fast-track evolution in the lab to create medicines, biofuels and industrial chemicals for modern life.
Harry Potter books have captured the imaginations of entire generations. Clark Jones/Courtesy of Scholastic, Inc./AP

Why I use Harry Potter to teach a college course on child development

A developmental psychologist explains how she uses Harry Potter books to make child development more relatable to first-year college students, many of whom grew up on the wildly popular books.
As doctors have learned more about the types of pain, they can better tailor treatment. Dundanim/Shutterstock.com

A way around opioids: Target the type of pain for better pain relief

As knowledge of pain and the highly addictive nature of opioids has grown, so has the knowledge grown about pain and its origins. A pain specialist explains the intricacies, and how treatment is changing as a result.
An Islamic revolution ran the shah out of Iran in 1979. Now, his father’s mummified body has resurfaced. AP Photo

Unearthed mummy recalls an Iran before the ayatollahs

A mummy unearthed during construction in Iran may be the body of a former shah. For the Islamic regime, the discovery is an unwelcome reminder of Iran's secular past. For protesters, it holds promise.
We don’t automatically question information we read or hear. Gaelfphoto/Shutterstock.com

Why you stink at fact-checking

Cognitive psychologists know the way our minds work means we not only don't notice errors and misinformation we know are wrong, we also then remember them as true.
Could the yearly flu shot become a thing of the past? AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File

Influenza: The search for a universal vaccine

Flu virus mutates so quickly that one year's vaccine won't work on the next year's common strains. But rational design – a new way to create vaccines – might pave the way for more lasting solutions.
People in the U.S. and the Caribbean share vulnerability to climate change-related disasters, but only in the Caribbean is the public truly worried. Why? US Navy

Caribbean residents see climate change as a severe threat but most in US don’t — here’s why

New research suggests politics and risk perception may explain why the US and Caribbean see climate change so differently, though both places are ever more vulnerable to powerful hurricanes.
First lady Melania Trump, Queen Rania of Jordan and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos talk with students at the Excel Academy Public Charter School last April. Principal Dana Bogle, on left. AP / Pablo Martinez Monsivais

What we can learn from closure of charter school that DeVos praised as ‘shining example’

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos once called Excel Academy Public Charter School a 'shining example.' A Vanderbilt scholar explains why that description was woefully off target.

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