Articles on US Congress

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Trump before delivering the State of the Union address with Pelosi and Pence. Doug Mills/The New York Times/Pool via REUTERS

Immigration, legislation, investigation and child poverty: 4 scholars respond to Trump’s State of the Union

Four scholars weigh in on President Donald Trump's State of the Union speech, exploring his statements on immigration, childhood poverty, the border wall and the investigations into his campaign.
Letter from President Trump to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. AP/Wayne Partlow

Separation of powers: An invitation to struggle

After the recent government shutdown and breakdowns in functioning within all three branches, it looks like the separation of powers system is broken or unbalanced. It is – and it isn't.
President Donald Trump speaks in the Rose Garden. AP Photo/ Evan Vucci

The shutdown took so long to end because it became a moral issue

Research on the psychology of politics reveals that when issues are framed in terms of moral right and wrong, the possibility of compromise becomes very small.
Ilhan Omar, a newly elected Democratic congresswoman from Minnesota, joins other Democrats during a news conference in Washington on Jan. 4 about the introduction of the ‘For the People’ Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The urgent need for Democrats to embrace progressive policies

The Democratic party needs a revised image, grounded in a new reality, that will address basic issues of inequality, access and fairness.
Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, makes a statement, as U.S. President Donald Trump, left, looks on. AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Trump’s interpreters for Putin meetings face ethical dilemma

Confidentiality is written into the code of ethics that governs the profession. Will Congress force them to break it to learn the contents of Trump’s private meetings?
Members of Congress, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., second from right, walk toward the Capitol building, Jan. 4, 2019. AP/Andrew Harnik

Would bringing back pork-barrel spending end government shutdowns?

Banned since 2011, pork-barrel spending may well help Congress pass bills on schedule. Now, a powerful Democratic lawmaker said she'd like to resurrect the practice to make passing budgets easier.
GOP President Ronald Reagan and Democratic House Speaker Tip O'Neill at the April, 1983 signing of bipartisan social security legislation. AP/Barry Thumma

Congress used to pass bipartisan legislation – will it ever again?

Most Congresses since the 1970s have passed more than 500 laws, ranging from nuclear disarmament to deficit reduction. Will today's bitter partisanship hamstring the new Congress' productivity?

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