Andrew Edward Tchie

Conflict Advisor, Ph.D. candidate and Associate Fellow, University of Essex

My Ph.D. research which was submitted in January 2018, seeks to understand the trends and the use of indiscriminate violence in conflicts. I explore the different strategic positions, which actor(s) adopted during the decade-long Nepalese conflict (1996-2006). Firstly, I demonstrate who the actors of the conflict are, and establish why it is important to rethink the way actor(s) in a conflict are categorised. Secondly, I establish how the identified actors, are not static, but uncover how actors can adopt strategic positions. I then present the theoretical framework, entitled the Concept of Embeddedness. The Concept of Embeddedness addresses the conditions in which civilians experience indiscriminate violence during conflicts. I demonstrate how the strategic movement and positioning of actors within conflict zones renders civilians wedged between embedded actors who control a zone and actors who are sent on temporary deployment to the zone. I then reveal how the position of embeddedness triggers other actors to use indiscriminate violence against civilians in different zones. I frequently write about UN peacekeeping, the protection of civilians in UN peacekeeping missions, violence against civilians and civil war dynamics. My previous conflict advisor and field research postings include South Sudan, Nepal, Botswana, Turkey, Mauritius, Uganda, and Botswana.

Experience

  • –present
    PhD student and associate fellow in Government at the University of Essex, University of Essex

Education

  • 2014 
    University of Essex, MPhil in Goverment
  • 2013 
    University of Essex, MSc in Conflict Resolution
  • 2011 
    University of London, MA in Political Communications
  • 2006 
    University of Sussex, BA in Broadcast Production

Professional Memberships

  • Member of the Research School on Peace (PRIO)
  • PhD Fellow at the Michael Nicholson Centre for Conflict and Cooperation
  • PhD Fellow at the Institute for Democracy and Conflict Resolution
  • The Higher Education Academy (HEA)