Jasmine Fardouly

Postdoctoral research fellow, Macquarie University

My research focuses on social influences on young women's body image concerns, such as the impact of appearance comparisons. Young women spend large amounts of time on social media, such as Facebook, and I am interested in examining what impact that has on their emotional wellbeing.

I also conduct research on attitudes and stigma related to obesity and bariatric surgery. More broadly, I am interested in research that combines topics from both social and health psychology.

I spent six months conducting research at the Centre for Appearance Research at the University of the West of England in Bristol and completed my PhD at UNSW Australia. Currently, I am working as a Postdoctoral Researcher at Macquarie University's Centre for Emotional Health.

Experience

  • 2016–present
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Macquarie University
  • 2012–2016
    PhD Candidate, UNSW Australia

Education

  • 2016 
    UNSW Australia , PhD
  • 2010 
    UNSW Australia , B. Psychol (Hons)

Publications

  • 2017
    The impact of appearance comparisons made through social media, traditional media, and in person in women’s everyday lives., Body Image
  • 2016
    Social media and body image: Current research and future directions., Current Opinion in Psychology
  • 2015
    Social comparisons on social media: The impact of Facebook on young women's body image concerns and mood., Body Image
  • 2015
    Negative comparisons about one's appearance mediate the relationship between Facebook usage and body image concerns., Body Image
  • 2015
    The mediating role of appearance comparisons in the relationship between media usage and self-objectification in young women, Psychology of Women Quarterly
  • 2014
    Reducing the stigma of bariatric surgery: Benefits of providing information about necessary lifestyle changes., Obesity
  • 2013
    The stigma of obesity surgery: Negative evaluations based on weight-loss history., Obesity Surgery
  • 2012
    Changes in weight bias following weight loss: The impact of weight-loss method., International Journal of Obesity