Visting Research Fellow, Division of Social Work and Social Care, School of Social and International Studies, University of Bradford

Philip Giligan retired as a senior lecturer in the Division of Social Work at the University of Bradford in January 2014. He is now a visiting research fellow and freelance researcher. He has worked previously as a social work practitioner, manager and educator in both the statutory and voluntary sector in Derbyshire, Kenya, Rochdale, Kirklees and Bradford. He has research experience and interest in a variety of areas, including child sexual abuse; the significance of religion, belief and culture to social work practice; and giving voice to service users in social work research. He is the co-author of the book 'Religion, Belief and Social Work: making a difference". His 2013 PhD was titled 'Exploring neglected elements of cultural competence in social work practice: promoting and developing understanding of religion, belief and culture.'

Experience

  • 1982–1983
    Community Development Social Worker, County Council of Elgeyo and Marakwet, Kenya
  • 1979–1981
    Senior Social Work Practitioner, Derbyshire Social Services Department
  • 1976–1979
    Social Worker, Derbyshire Social Services Department

Education

  • 2013 
    University of Bradford, PhD
  • 1991 
    Universty of Central Lancashire, Postgraduate Certificate in Practice Teaching
  • 1991 
    Central Council for the Education and Training in Social Work, Practice Teaching Award
  • 1976 
    University of Manchester, MA (Econ) in Social Work and Social Administration
  • 1976 
    Central Council for the Education and Training in Social Work, Certificate of Qualification in Social Work
  • 1974 
    University of Oxford, BA (Hons) in Modern History

Publications

  • 2012
    ‘Contrasting narratives on responses to victims and survivors of clerical abuse in England and Wales: challenges to Catholic Church discourse’, Child Abuse Review
  • 2012
    ‘Clerical Abuse and Laicisation: Rhetoric and Reality in the Catholic Church in England and Wales’, Child Abuse Review
  • 2012
    ‘‘It never came up’: encouragements and discouragements to addressing religion and belief in professional practice. What do social work students have to say?’, British Journal of Social Work
  • 2011
    ‘Fathers’ involvement in children’s services: exploring local and national issues in ‘Moorlandstown’’ , British Journal of Social Work
  • 2011
    ‘Evaluating the impact of Pyramid for Parents courses in North Town in 2009-2010: listening to the views of mothers and fathers’., British Journal of Social Work
  • 2010
    Social Work, Religion and Belief: Developing a Framework for Practice , British Journal of Social Work
  • 2010
    Religion, Belief and Social Work: Making A Difference , Policy Press
  • 2009
    ‘Considering religion and beliefs in child protection and safeguarding work: is any consensus emerging?’, Child Abuse Review
  • 2008
    ‘Child abuse and spirit possession: not just an issue for African migrants.’, childRight
  • 2008
    ‘The Common Assessment Framework: Does the Reality match the Rhetoric?’ , Child and Family Social Work
  • 2006
    ‘The Role of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work Practice: views and experiences of social workers and students’, British Journal of Social Work
  • 2006
    ‘Well-motivated Reformists or Nascent Radicals: How do applicants to the degree in social work see social problems, their origins and solutions?, British Journal of Social Work
  • 2006
    ‘Cultural barriers to the disclosure of child sexual abuse in Asian communities: listening to what women say’ , British Journal of Social Work