Professor and Canada Research Chair in Cold Regions Water Science, Wilfrid Laurier University

Dr. Marsh is currently a Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Cold Regions Water Science at Wilfrid Laurier University. He is located in the Geography and Environmental Studies Department and in the Cold Regions Research Centre.

Dr. Marsh has conducted field research in the Canadian Arctic since 1975, with a focus on cold regions water science. His research has always combined field observations with computer modelling in order to both carry out numerical experiments and to understand future changes. Currently his research is focused in the western Canadian Arctic near Inuvik, NWT where he has operated two research watersheds since 1991. Recently, these watersheds have instrumented with a collection of state of the art instrumentation in order to monitor changes in lakes and streams, and to develop improved prediction methods. Through the Government of the NWT - Wilfrid Laurier University Partnership, we collaborate with both government departments and Inuvialuit and Gwich'in governments in Inuvik.

Professor Marsh holds a PhD and MSc in Geography from the Department of Geography at McMaster University, and a BA from York University.

Experience

  • 2013–present
    Professor, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • 1983–2013
    Research Scientist, Environment Canada

Education

  • 1982 
    McMaster University, PhD
  • 1978 
    McMaster University, MSc
  • 1975 
    York University, BA

Publications

  • 2019
    Effect of snow microstructure variability on Ku-band radar snow water equivalent retrievals, The Cryosphere
  • 2019
    Improving permafrost modeling by assimulitating remotely sensed soil moisture, Water Resources Research
  • 2019
    Shrub tundra ecohydrology: rainfall interception is a major component of the water balance, Environmental Research Letters
  • 2019
    Birch shrubs increase frost table depth by advancing snowmelt timing in a shrub-tundra watershed north of Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Arctic Science
  • 2018
    The influence of snow microstructure on dual-frequency radar measurements in a tundra environment, Remote Sensing of Environment
  • 2018
    Challenges of using stable isotopes to estimate travel times and stream water ages in data sparse arctic environments, Hydrological Processes

Grants and Contracts

  • 2018
    Changes in Water Along the Dempster – Inuvik – Tuktoyaktuk Corridor as indicators of Aquatic Health
    Role:
    Principal Investigator
    Funding Source:
    NWT Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program
  • 2016
    Arctic Lakes: Past and future changes
    Role:
    Principal Investigator
    Funding Source:
    Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
  • 2016
    Changing Arctic Network
    Role:
    Principal Investigator
    Funding Source:
    Canada Foundation for Innovation
  • 2013
    Canada Research Chair in Cold Regions Water Science
    Role:
    Principal Investigator
    Funding Source:
    Canada Research Chair Program

Professional Memberships

  • American Geophysical Union
  • Canadian Geophysical Union

Honours

J. Tuzo Wilson Medal from the Canadian Geophysical Union; Fellow of the Arctic Institute of North America