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Renting for life? Housing shift requires rethink of renters' rights

Australia is the world capital for property speculation. Australians play property like Monopoly: buying, selling, demolishing, rebuilding, extending, renovating, always with the promise of appreciation…

For many people, renting is preferable to buying, but many of Australia’s institutions don’t reflect that choice. April Fonti/AAP

Australia is the world capital for property speculation. Australians play property like Monopoly: buying, selling, demolishing, rebuilding, extending, renovating, always with the promise of appreciation on resale. The contribution to GDP of real estate transactions alone is the highest in the world, and three times higher than that in the US.

Around one in seven Australian taxpayers owns one or more investment properties, aided by generous tax concessions. Australia has one of the highest levels of household debt in the OECD due to borrowings for property purchases.

This amounts to what is effectively an infinite demand for property in Australia, exacerbated by a growing global investor market. The resulting competition at sale is the main reason for Australia’s rapidly declining housing affordability. While some (but by no means all) of this activity is creating new dwellings for rent, the rents are increasing too.

Renters last

Renters are the losers in the property game. Not only do they struggle with high rents but tenant protection in Australia is among the weakest in the developed world. This is not coincidental: Australia’s 1.8 million and counting property investors support and are supported by tenancy legislation heavily weighted in favour of landlords. This produces a fundamental lack of security in rental housing.

Australia stands in stark contrast to North American and European countries, which have a range of much stronger tenant protections including rent control and security. As these are nuanced and vary from state to state in all these countries, as well as in Australia, broad comparisons are difficult to make. But a few key points can draw the picture.

In Victoria, rents can be increased every six months with no limit on the amount (though a tenant can appeal to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal if the amount exceeds similar properties in the same area). In Germany, which is around average for tenant protection in Europe, rent increases are capped at 20% every three years. Landlords who overcharge can be fined.

In Victoria, 60 days is the standard amount of notice required for a tenant to vacate. In Germany the notice requirements vary according to how long the tenant has lived there: three months is the minimum for someone who has lived in the property for less than five years. Six months notice is required for a tenancy between five and eight years; nine months for longer than eight years. Elderly long term tenants are protected: a landlord has to make a very strong case for their eviction, and is required to pay compensation and/or assist with their relocation.

In Victoria, tenants can be evicted so a property can be sold with vacant possession, which may or may not bring a bit more on the sale price. If the place is bought by another investor the property returns to the rental market some months after the original tenants had to find a new home. In Germany this is illegal: tenanted properties are sold with their tenant in place.

This strong legislation is possible partly because of the role of large landholding institutions in Germany that treat their housing assets as long-term secure investments that provide a steady return. The resulting long leases mean tenants can consider their rented property their home and fit it out accordingly. The tenancy protections supporting this arrangement act as a disincentive to speculators, which in turn reduces demand for investment properties and therefore competition at sale.

When people prefer to rent

The historical and cultural contexts in Australia and Europe are profoundly different of course, but it is useful to reflect on the institutional and legal practices that enable renting one’s home to be the norm.

In contrast to Australia, where land and housing are treated as commodities, the combination of large landholders and strong tenant protections in Europe creates a self-reinforcing cycle that maintains house prices and rents at relatively stable and affordable levels. The resulting security means Europe doesn’t have anything like the stigma against renters that can be found in Australia.

Australia is changing, however. The prohibitive cost of housing for purchase, desire to delay or avoid the burden of housing debt, and simultaneous growth of a footloose, casualised workforce – whether by circumstance or choice – is creating generations of people who prefer to rent.

As cultural attitudes change, the institutions should follow. The potential role of Australian superannuation funds in investing in housing has been avoided for too long: for decades trillions of dollars of workers’ hard-earned have been distributed over a range of investments without alleviating Australia’s crisis of housing affordability.

The super funds are finally reconsidering this position, and so too should Australia’s legal practices adapt. Legislative changes should be made to facilitate significant super fund investment in secure and affordable rental housing, followed by strengthened tenancy protections.

If these changes were coupled with reduction of the tax incentives to small property investors, the market would shift dramatically. But this would require Australian voters to curb their enthusiasm for the property game. What are the chances of that?

Join the conversation

55 Comments sorted by

  1. Garry Claridge

    Systems Analyst

    This is a reality check in regard to how using GDP as a measure of prosperity is dangerous.

    Owning your home is a significant contributor to wellbeing and prosperity. With speculation, as we see in Australia, owning a home is becoming harder and approaching the point of impossible for many Australians.

    When I hear news commentators declare, with joy, that the housing "market" is rising, I feel sad for the future of the people of our nation.

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    1. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to Garry Claridge

      Like any business, owning property carries with it it's own skill set which not everyone shares, or is interested. I am very happy with the idea of landlords and tenants mutually obligated to one another.

      I am not at all happy, as appears about everyone here, with the fundamental tyranny and false economy of housing speculation which at the end of the day whoever happens to be last man standing cops the entire cost, while the agents sit back with their fat fees and gloating cynicism.

      Our rule is to buy property, not sell property. If we have to demolish a house occasionally, because it's old and beyond amortisation (Fr. mort = dead) and rebuild, that's what we do.

      It's no problem. For us to prosper our key asset is not property but good, stable, long term tenants who pay their rent and bills on time, and who we look after like family.

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  2. Suzy Gneist
    Suzy Gneist is a Friend of The Conversation.

    Multi-tasker at Graphic Design & Montville Coffee

    Having been brought up in a country where renting for life is the common norm and where many live in one or two properties during their lifetime and consider these home, the lack of renters' rights came as a shock to me in Australia. The fact that one could be required to move house (services, furniture, schools, etc) every 6 months if the landlords were speculators, made renting very expensive, insecure and stressful. After a few years of this with a small child i was glad to be able to afford to build a home - i feel sorry for those who are forced to put up with fickle landlords.

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  3. John Crest

    logged in via email @live.com.au

    Renters have the right to pay their rent in exchange for living in the home.

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    1. Craig Read

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to John Crest

      This doesn't only affect home owners by the way.

      I know of some business owners in Melbourne who nearly closed their family after 20 years due to exorbitant rent increases over the last 3 years. However, they got in touch with the landlord. The landlord was actually very happy with their long-term tenants and never increased (or wanted to increase) the rent. The estate agent increased it and pocketed the difference.

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  4. Colin MacGillivray

    Architect, retired, Sarawak

    Excellent. Germany seem to be an example to follow. Here in Sarawak property owning for the long term is common but speculation is almost zero. There are few "For Sale" signs anywhere and the entire Real Estate adverts in the paper occupy a quarter of one page. Property inflation is purely linked to increase in construction costs and a few desirable areas becoming more so. Hundreds of new houses on the edge of town set a benchmark.
    With security of tenure being old and renting is better. Imagine selling your $500,000 house when you are aged 85 and renting it for 4% of its value- that's $20,000 a year. Leaves plenty for future rentals and the bucket list.

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  5. Steve Hindle

    logged in via email @bigpond.com

    Removing the tax concession on investment properties was done by Paul Keating in the 1980s and due to problems ended up being reversed. It would need careful planing for the effects it has on the market if removal was tried again.
    As removing it reduces the return for landlords, it can lead to substantial rental increases as the market tries to regain its return on investment (this happened last time). It also has the effect of reducing house prices as landlords dump housing and move to other investments that do allow tax deductions. Lower house prices would be a net benefit but you can be sure it would upset people with vested interests, especially current home owners and the building and real estate industries.
    "If these changes were coupled with reduction of the tax incentives to small property investors.." Is a suggestion that tax incentives to large property investors are to treated differently to small property investors. Our tax system is already too complicated.

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    1. Jeff Payne

      PhD in Political Science and Masters in Public Policy

      In reply to Steve Hindle

      Thanks for the article Kate. It is an issue worthy of much more discussion than it currently receives.

      I think you have identified the real problem, Steve. Thanks for the post. The Australian economy is overly dependent upon property prices either staying at least steady or increasing. At the moment there is a deliberate drive by the Australian government to increase the value of property as a solution to the end of the mining boom. That is, increased property value allows increased borrowing…

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    2. Craig Read

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Steve Hindle

      "Lower house prices would be a net benefit but you can be sure it would upset people with vested interests, especially current home owners and the building and real estate industries."

      I have a mortgage and definitely think the price of housing needs to come down. But dropping housing prices could create significant issues with people owing more than their house is actually worth. I think the only way you could tackle it (without creating a sub-prime scenario) is to somehow put a freeze on housing prices. Most "investors" wouldn't like that though.

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    3. Steve Hindle

      logged in via email @bigpond.com

      In reply to Jeff Payne

      If you accept that the primary purpose of a house is to give its occupants a secure place to live, whether renting or owning, at an affordable price, then our tax system should be designed around that concept.
      Unfortunately the primary purpose of our tax system with regards to housing tries to raise as much money as possible without upsetting voters.
      Ideally the tax system should discourage people from using our homes as investments to make more money. It should also not discourage people from moving homes if a new job means a lot more travelling time, (which is exactly what stamp duty does). I think a small and progressive capital gains tax would give Australians the incentive to put their excess money into other investments. As a country, we don't make a lot by investing in McMansions (and they come with a demoralising mortgage).

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    4. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to Jeff Payne

      We don't make "the system fairer", Jeff. Such is an oxymoron.

      We simply don't play by "the system" to start with. There is nobody forcing anybody to do so, beyond being held in thrall buy the big institutional investors who see us coming a mile away.

      We are quite capable and indeed do so, of buying property and retaining it, not with a view to speculating and profit-taking on sale but toward investing our time and effort instead in finding and keeping good stable tenants who pay their rent…

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  6. Mustafa Epstein

    Political Scientist

    "Australia’s 1.8 million and counting property investors support and are supported by tenancy legislation heavily weighted in favour of landlords."

    Maybe Future Fellows could contribute to a voluntary fund to pay oppressed renters back rent. That should solve the problem.

    I'm surprised you didn't call for compulsory acquisition of property and its redistribution to single mothers.

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    1. Simon Kerr

      observer

      In reply to Mustafa Epstein

      Mustafa,

      the argument is that compared internationally, Australia weights in favor of landlords. That is a comparative argument. If this argument is incorrect, make a case. Sarcasm does not advance any argument here.

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    2. Felix MacNeill

      Environmental Manager

      In reply to Simon Kerr

      Sarcasm is all he's capable of, Simon - reason and evidence escape him.

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    1. Amy Manning

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Meg Thornton

      Couldn't agree more. I've had more housing applications rejected than I have had unsuccesfull job interviews! And finding somewhere to live is a far more stressful exercise than finding a job. #2 on the list of basic needs, after food.

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  7. Henry Verberne

    Once in the fossil fuel industry but now free to speak up

    Shame to note the trolls who make comments designed to enrage and inflame, no nuanced argument or information from them!

    To you out there, yes you, if you all you have is emotive remarks, go elsewhere for your kicks!

    I suggest you ignore them; they are easy to pick out.

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  8. Peter West

    CEO at Property

    I find this article absolutely outrageous in terms of my direct experience of renting homes to people.
    For instance one property in a rural NSW area I rented to two people both on government benefits.
    Both young people, one single mother's benefit, the other got drunk, had a car accident, lost partial sight in one eye (the rest of him is OK). He is now on disability support benefit.
    So they're getting over $800 per fortnight from you and me.
    One party stopped paying 6 months ago. The other party…

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    1. Craig Read

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Peter West

      Peter, there are certainly bad tenants to be had. It's up to the landlord (or their agent) to work out who to rent to. That doesn't take away from the fact that the system is fundamentally broken though.

      Also, you're describing a problem that the housing commission used to solve. But something like public housing is considered to be far too "socialist" to be fashionable these days.

      And as somebody who rented out a property once before (and sold it off as a bad joke afterwards), I can tell you that renting to friends or family is much worse.

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    2. Simon Kerr

      observer

      In reply to Peter West

      Peter, I have been a tenant and have taken a Landlord to the tenancy tribunal (and won) as well as having been a landlord and have had to take tenants to the tenancy tribunal (and won both times). There are, occasionally, very poor tenants, and also very poor landlords. That is life, and we learn from these experiences.

      I do think though you have missed the point of the article. The affordability of housing in Australia is a serious issue, and, bad tenants notwithstanding, security for tenants in Australia is the worst I have seen (note, above, I have been on both sides of the fence).

      I am surprised though that you can't resolve your tenancy issue after 6 months with no rent. That does not make sense to me. Change the locks? I do have empathy with your situation though; it would frustrate me I am sure.

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    3. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to Peter West

      I do think you really do need to learn your ropes, Peter.

      You come across as incompetent, allowing a pair of dingbats, a couple of drugged-up dickheads, to give you the run-around for so very long, and then complaining that the law won't help you. Help your bloody self finally.

      By God mate, they wouldn't get past a week late before I'd have them out of there quick bloody smart, assuming I'd have taken them on to start with. And I've done it, with the local sergeant standing by grinning because…

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  9. matt escartin

    logged in via Twitter

    In South Korea, there is sometimes an option for the lessee to put down a large deposit to secure the rental rights rather than paying a typical rental payment. The owner/lessor uses the deposit to offset their mortgage payments and repays this deposit to the lessee when the lease has run its full course.

    The pricing was typically $10,000 increment in deposit as equivalent to $100/month in rent. As a lessee you were able to negotiate the size of the deposit and your monthly (non refunded) payment.

    Whilst saving for your own home you do need somewhere to live, and this deposit system in South Korea offers those renters another level of strategic flexibility in the period before you do have a sizeable deposit which I certainly wish we had in Australia.

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  10. Troy Howard

    Mechanic at -

    As someone who is currently caught in the rental trap I thought I would throw a few observations out there.

    I lost my house and possessions during the GFC due to my personal illness (resulting in me losing my job) and subsequent serious life threatening illness of my child. The bank foreclosed it was not at all interested in restructuring our debt or helping in anyway, this all happened during the first panicky stages of GFC.
    Due to my subsequent bankruptcy I am forced to rent there is simply…

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    1. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to Troy Howard

      Troy, mate, don't waste your time and effort worrying about those sorts of people. They suck, seriously.

      From this point, spend your time getting to know your way around, get to know a few people, look around a bit to see what else might be available especially among the Chinese and ethnic communities, and in time find yourself a good landlord who owns the building and manages it himself, and by definition looking for good stable tenants, tell him or her your story, and go for it.

      If need be…

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    2. Amy Manning

      logged in via Facebook

      In reply to Troy Howard

      I agree with Tom, don't even bother communicating with a Property Manager. Go straight to the residential tribunal. I've found them to be the only people who offer any kind of help/advice to renters. They can act as mediators for you too.

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  11. Amy Manning

    logged in via Facebook

    A very serious, very real conversation needs to be had about the housing situation in large cities in Australia. There is something fundamentally broken when a young adult, who has been working full time for over 10 years has only two real options in terms of housing;
    1. Bounce around from one shitty, poorly maintained rental property to another (8 homes and counting!), where you pay almost the same amount in rent as mortgage repayments, all while trying to save a deposit for a place of your own…

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  12. Merrilyn Rowler

    Tenant Advocate

    When reading this article, and the point being made about the lack of tenant rights and protections in Australia, I must point to the state of Queensland, where the Govt has de funded the main organisation which provides these services to tenants. The Tenant Union and its regional agencies, Tenant Advice and Advocacy service (TAAS) were de funded by Qld Govt over 12 months a go and have limped through to Dec last year with a couple of smaller amounts of Federal Govt funding, but that too is now finished.
    How do tenants who struggle to even know what rights they might have, hold landlords to account and in to begin to enforce their rights.

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    1. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to Merrilyn Rowler

      The deeper question here, Merrilyn, and no offense intended, is why is such a thing as a "tenant advocate" even required?

      The more tenant advocates there are, is surely symptomatic of just how bad the prevailing system actually is.

      Less reason for government support, not more, until finally people wake up finally and abandon it altogether.

      Believe me, nobody is going to starve, or have no bed to sleep in or roof over their head in the process.

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    2. Merrilyn Rowler

      Tenant Advocate

      In reply to Tom Fisher

      Well Tom Fisher I am sure all those homeless people will be so pleased when you tell them nobody will starve or have no bed to sleep in.
      I have been working with tenants, mostly public housing tenants, but tenants in general for around 30 years, and I live in a regional centre in Qld which has been seriously affected by a mining boom.
      I can tell you very clearly that there are many people who have no bed, and for so many others, affording food comes second to the outrageous rents being charged…

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    3. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to Merrilyn Rowler

      You are beginning to interest me, Merrilyn, and I say again that the fact that you exist at all means that housing in Australia, or Queensland perhaps, is simply not working; that the more of you exist the worse it is.

      Now you are telling me, on public forum and without identifying where you live and which people are affected, that they have nowhere to live, no bed to sleep in, and are unable to secure a lease for longer than 3 months. Who? Who in their right mind just sits there on the ground…

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    4. Jeff Payne

      PhD in Political Science and Masters in Public Policy

      In reply to Tom Fisher

      I don’t know what world you live in Tom but I agree with Merrilyn and I find it questionable to call someone who is trying to inform you of a situation a liar. It may be hard to hear evidence that one’s position may be wrong but the truth is the truth and to hide from that truth is to do the most disgusting thing imaginable; it is to deliberately look away.

      To lift it above personal experience a little let’s stick to the facts. Links follow. There are 105,237 people homeless in Australia at the…

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    5. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to Jeff Payne

      A liar? Who called anyone a liar?

      The observation I made, since Merrilyn raised the matter off-topic, is concerned with state funding of advocates, to which I added activists, with on logging off the word in mind lobbyists.

      The question is concerned with state funding of lobbyists, when as field anthropologists years ago were proscribed by lawyers admonishing the justice system to allow people to speak for themselves, so the worm turns and now we have courts ignoring lawyers to allow people…

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    6. Merrilyn Rowler

      Tenant Advocate

      In reply to Tom Fisher

      Tom If you know as much about housing issues as you seem to suggest, then it would take you no time at all to figure out there is only a few options for regional centres in Qld where I live, but as you seem not able to do that, I live in Mackay, in what is called the Bowen Basin.
      As I mentioned first up I have been working as an advocate for tenants who struggle to know their rights and enforce those rights, but to again throw the proverbial cat amongst the pigeons, in those almost 30 years, I…

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    7. Jeff Payne

      PhD in Political Science and Masters in Public Policy

      In reply to Tom Fisher

      Yes, you a right, you did not call anyone a liar. I mistakenly moved from a claim of disbelief towards a claim of personal experience to it being an accusation of there being a lie and that move was wrong. It was late and I apologise. Just for clarity, I certainly did not call you a liar either but tit-for-tat is fine with me. Further, this will simply have to be my final post on the matter as these thing take time to write.

      To move to the meat of the issue, I say intermediate institutions (those…

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    8. Mike Jubow

      Forestry nurseryman at Nunyara Wholesale , Forestry consultants, seedling suppliers.

      In reply to Jeff Payne

      Jeff, one would be justified in taking the statement, "No, sorry, I simply do not believe you." as calling someone a liar by implication in the circumstances above. Tom Fisher must be feeling so much better after spilling out all that agressive bile in his defece of his stance of 'Profits before People' style of commentary. He fails to recognise common problems existant in our society across the nation, the failure of successive governments in organising real affordable accomodation and advocacy for those who for many reasons cannot advocate on their own behalf.

      With attitudes he has clearly espoused, Mr Fisher is an essential part of the problem, with no will to listen to understand what the real problems are, we can only hope the likes of Mr Fisher are not in the position to advise our weak-kneed, jelly livered politicians.

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    9. Merrilyn Rowler

      Tenant Advocate

      In reply to Mike Jubow

      well said Mike Jubow
      God savs us from arm chair experts who find it really difficult to indulge in a challenging conversation without the need for a willingness to hear a point of view with which they don't agree, resulting in name calling and rudeness to justify their opinions.

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    10. Troy Howard

      Mechanic at -

      In reply to Merrilyn Rowler

      As you said Merrilyn,
      "and should they say anything about repairs, or otherwise make any sort of complaint, they their lease simply isn't renewed. With a private rental market vacancy rate hovering around zero - 1% having rights means absolutely nothing."
      I know if I were to complain to vociferously my lease will NOT be renewed and as any potential landlord needs references I will not get a new one as I am now considered a troublemaker.

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    11. Jeff Payne

      PhD in Political Science and Masters in Public Policy

      In reply to Troy Howard

      Well said Troy.

      These secret files that are available to owners of property are a travesty of justice. There is no recourse to correct your record even if you do find out what has been recorded. This is one area that desperately needs to be visited in any review of the laws that determine the relationship between tenants and rentiers.

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    12. Andy Cameron

      Care giver

      In reply to Mike Jubow

      Mike, "I do not believe you" could be interpreted as agnostic on the cause. It could just as easily suggest Merrilyn is ill-informed.

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    13. Mike Jubow

      Forestry nurseryman at Nunyara Wholesale , Forestry consultants, seedling suppliers.

      In reply to Andy Cameron

      Merrilyn "Il-informed"? A lady who has volunteered her time for something like 30 years to tennant advocacy? Give us a break. There would be very few people who are better qualified to talk on the issues she has raised.

      I have personally known this lady since 1991 and she holds my deepest respect for her tireless efforts to help others and this even at a personal cost to her, and has never been on the gravy-train of government or industry grants.

      It annoys me intensely when ininformed people…

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    14. Merrilyn Rowler

      Tenant Advocate

      In reply to Mike Jubow

      I thank you for your kind words Mike.
      I do what I can when I can, but get completely frustrated when those with decision making power are offered advice from those who understand the real issues, then do whatever their political ideology dictates anyway, leaving those at the end of the line struggling away as before

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  13. R. Ambrose Raven

    none

    Government housing policy has for a long time been to subsidise the provision of private rental and owner accommodation rather than fund a meaningful quantity of public housing. Housing has been turned into a commodity, for which we are paying a very high but increasing price.

    VicUrban, like LandCorp in WA, is in it to make money without regard to social need or social cost. Another example of public organisations being perverted to serve profit-seeking sector greed at the cost of social need…

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    1. Tom Fisher

      Editor and Proofreader

      In reply to R. Ambrose Raven

      Your comment on Landcorp over in Western Australia is simply not correct. Landcorp works very closely with state housing and private investors to provide mixed housing scattered throughout the city, in recent times especially about the inner city, North Perth and East Perth.

      The model is good because inherently non-speculative, with some units in any given development set aside for long term state housing tenants and the rest placed on the open market.

      I honestly do not believe there needs…

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    2. R. Ambrose Raven

      none

      In reply to Tom Fisher

      “Landcorp works very closely with state housing and private investors to provide mixed housing scattered throughout the city, in recent times especially about the inner city, North Perth and East Perth.” No, it doesn’t, it works to make a profit from the sale of public housing, with the odd gesture towards the absolutely minimal public housing stocks.

      As you know perfectly well if you know anything about it, people on the standard Homeswest waiting list have no change of a Homeswest place…

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  14. Chris Booker

    Research scientist

    Great article, it's good to see someone taking this seriously. I'm in NZ but I'm surprised our country hasn't bested you in the GDP to housing transaction ratio - our whole economy seems to have been running off housing speculation for the last decade. There really is a generation now that will never be able to afford their own home, not unless some elder family members die off and leave a home as inheritance. And one of the big problems here is the marked difference in housing quality between people…

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  15. Nick

    logged in via Twitter

    No mention of ages and nationalities of investors? I don't know how anyone under 40, who doesn't already own a property, can even think about affording to buy.

    I've had to move 3 times in 3 years (the whims of landlords) - most new landlords don't want families by the way. All the places we tried to buy were sold for 100-200k over the asking price to foreign investors. Properties then went straight on the market at inflated rental prices.

    One in seven now own investment properties? It's fast becoming an unethical investment. Investment is becoming a case of screwing over families who can't think about affording a primary home.

    Both me and my partner earn quite a lot. Most money goes in rent (and childcare). Clever dicks say to just live somewhere cheaper - but that would involve massive commutes and impractical arrangements for childcare.

    I'd ask for something to be done but the have's seem to not give a flying fuck about the have nots these days.

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  16. Leo Braun

    Conscientious Objector

    "Renters have the right to pay their rent in exchange for living in the home"! https://theconversation.com/renting-for-life-housing-shift-requires-rethink-of-renters-rights-20538#comment_284434

    • Manifestly there are none so blind as those who refuse to see the reality. Pertaining to those who know not what they are unable to know, yet incessantly toying at collecting items of the ignorant intellect. Ever expanding the darkness of their cave!

    No wonder for a failing to notice hell-bent regime tormented people! Compelled to face the ruled evildoers who exercised sadism reflexes. Adamant to bury alive the law-abiding citizens just because of the principled stance taken for the better Australia ... http://savetenantservices.net.au/2091/a-tenants-tale-of-the-landlord-from-hell/#comment-7748

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  17. Cameron Howlett || Financial Adviser Melbourne

    logged in via LinkedIn

    As a financial planner that manages a number of smsf's I can confirm that there would overwhelming support for a series of government issued bonds that could be used for the purpose of building and upgrading a rail network to connect regional areas to major cities.

    By doing this it will open up the supply, which would in turn decrease the cost for the first home buyer to purchase their first home which would still be close to their workplace.

    The issue with the existing system of stamp duty reductions and first home buyers grants are they are in effect a subsidy which therefore artificially increases the price of a house.

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  18. Frank P Mcenroe

    logged in via Facebook

    Does anyone making comments actually know how much rent they pay,
    If I said 95% of every cent you earn, I would be labeled as being crazy. try prove my figure wrong, if you do try to work out how much rent you pay. you will be a genius, everyday you contribute to hundreds of landlords/moneylenders. how do you do this. lets take one loaf of bread on a supermarket shelf. that loaf starts a seeds of wheat on a farm . every step along the road to the supermarket shelf landlords and moneylenders…

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