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Smart meters are about as dangerous as …

Most fairly well educated people recognise pseudoscience as bunkum when they see it — astrology, young-earth creationism, alien abduction, pyramid power … Yet some of these same people are now being sucked…

Smart meters worldwide use conventional cell phone networks to transmit their data. portland general

Most fairly well educated people recognise pseudoscience as bunkum when they see it — astrology, young-earth creationism, alien abduction, pyramid power … Yet some of these same people are now being sucked into a movement that is, according to all rigorous scientific analysis, as equally without foundation as the ones listed above: the anti-smart meter movement.

Smart meters – in case you’ve missed it – are devices now being installed by electric and gas utilities in millions of homes and apartments internationally. A few times a day the meter briefly sends a report on usage, via a wireless system entirely similar to that used by mobile telephones.

Obviously such devices have advantages, both for the user and for the utility. One of the present authors discovered, using his smart meter, that his swimming pool filter pump was using roughly 450KWhr per month, costing more than US$100 a month. He then replaced this with a new highly efficient, multispeed pump, and has now reduced this cost to roughly US$40. Happy? He was pumped!

Yet there is a rapidly growing movement opposing the installation of these meters. In the US, an organisation known as Stop Smart Meters claims to be “fighting for our health, privacy, and safety".

Similar organisations have sprung up in Canada and Australia, and interest is spreading worldwide. Letter templates for legal complaints to the Federal US government are easily downloadable.

Who’s who

Unlike other pseudoscience, the anti-smart meter movements are not, for the main part, being organised in right wing, fundamentalist or not-well-educated circles. In Marin County, California, a trendy suburb north of San Francisco (and hardly a hotbed of pseudoscience!), county officials have criminalised the installation of smart meters, citing “health effects” of their usage.

In Canada, the British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal has accepted a complaint from Citizens for Safe Technology, a group dedicated to “protect[ing] children and nature from unsafe wireless technologies".

Canadian tribunals often investigate dubious complaints, so this does not necessarily mean that BC is about to ban smart meters.

Facts, please

What are the health risks? As mentioned above, smart meters worldwide use conventional cell phone networks to transmit their data. In the largest study conducted so far, researchers in Denmark found no increased risk of brain tumours from long-term usage of cell phones.

But even if some minute health risk is ultimately found for heavy cell phone usage, microwave exposure from smart meters is only a microscopic fraction.

Smart meters only transmit data for roughly 1.4 seconds per day, at very low wattage. According to B.C. Hydro in Canada: “Exposure to radio frequency during a 20-year life span of a smart meter is equivalent to the exposure during a single 30-minute cell phone call.”

Even this reckoning is exceedingly generous, since the typical cell phone is held to the ear, whereas smart meters are typically many feet away from humans, and thus microwave exposure is tens of thousands of times lower.

Meet the “experts”

All these rational and reassuring facts do not stop the anti smart meter “experts” from revealing all the terrible things being covered up. They always sound impressively scientific to the uninitiated.

We should also note that privacy concerns — real and imagined — quickly join the list of scary things about smart meters.

But there are a lot of nasty conspiracy-milking types such as Alex Jones, Stewart Swerdlow, Bill Deagle, Jeff Rense and True Ott ready to take advantage of every human frailty.

They have never met a conspiracy theory they could not exploit. Many are explicitly or implicitly antisemitic. Such names are increasingly showing up in “legitimate” right-wing contexts, partly thanks to Ron Paul’s brand of “libertarianism.”

Swerdlow even blogs for the Huffington Post and tells us that:

Stewart A. Swerdlow has the ability to see energy fields and personal archetypes as well as read DNA sequences and mind-patterns. A powerful intuitive, he uses and teaches Universal Law to help others resolve life issues, even reaching into simultaneous existences and beyond.

His great uncle, Yakov Sverdlov, was the first president of the Soviet Union, leading to Stewart’s involvement in the infamous ‘Montauk Project’.

Similarly, William Deagle – who uses the honorific Doctor despite no longer being allowed to practise his “medicine” – can spout superficially compelling nonsense on weaponised viruses, chem trails, micro-nuclear weapons, the Oklahoma city bombing, shape-changing reptiles, the Illuminati, the new world order, and smart meters, all while claiming to be one of the witnesses from Revelations and leading tours to the Holy Land.

Deagle’s realtor wife Michelle runs an internet-based “nutrition” site (such are now illegal in Canada), and they both appear on so-called Intelligent Talk radio station KCBQ in San Diego.

An inadvertently amusing peek at a season in the life of the Deagle family can be seen from the following smart meter letters to and from San Diego Gas and Power, a peace offering from the Deagles, and a fine final letter from the power company.

But there is nothing remotely amusing about this crowd. Almost certainly, most opponents of smart meters have no idea of the company they are keeping.

Ignorance or disingenuity?

In any event, it strikes the present authors that the proponents of the anti-smart meter movement are, at the least, being highly inconsistent. If they truly believe their health is at risk from microwave exposure via smart meter broadcasts, they should immediately cease using cell phones (including smart phones and iPads), and should not permit anyone to carry or use such a device on their property.

For that matter, such persons should avoid any public place, including grocery stores or restaurants, where someone might use a cell phone, or where a WiFi hotspot might be in operation.

What’s more, they should stop using microwave ovens, which, even if in compliance with governmental regulations, emit thousands of times as much microwave radiation as a smart meter.

But somehow the present authors do not think the trendy anti-smart meter fans in the upper middle-class suburbs of San Francisco, Vancouver or elsewhere are going to give up their cell phones any times soon; nor are they going to give up microwave ovens or leisurely lunches with friends at the local WiFi-enabled bistro or cafe.

And therein lies the problem — either such persons are massively misinformed as to the relative risks, or else they are being highly disingenuous in their public declarations on the subject. The reader can decide which is the more likely explanation.

Either way, it does not speak well for the level of scientific education worldwide that such movements can gain traction. We can only hope a sceptical press will finally take this movement on.

But in a world where extremists are considered mainstream, don’t hold your breath.

A version of this article appeared on Math Drudge.

Join the conversation

54 Comments sorted by

  1. John Newlands

    tree changer

    First up I should mention that a meter reader ran over my dog so I should be pleased to see that occupation eliminated. That's good that occasionally people are able to pinpoint excessive energy use by appliances. However experience in Victoria and several US States points to an overwhelming perception that the meters are a tool for rationing. That is they primarily help the utilities while offering at best a sporting chance of holding energy bills level, or maybe lower than otherwise. Having to…

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  2. George Michaelson

    Person

    Meters are capital costs. They appear to be something which should have a very long lifetime in the field, and so a very low, background payback. Certainly, regarding my electricity and gas meter I have now, both are demonstrably over 20 years old. I suspect far older (my electricity meter is apparently marked as 'rural' but has been in an innner-city suburb for as long as the house has had power. Its cleary been re-deployed)

    Yet, the costs associated with smart meter deployment appear to be recouped…

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    1. Chris O'Neill

      Retired Way Before 70

      In reply to George Michaelson

      " I detect a model of 'recover in first year'"

      I'd guess a Radio Rentals or mobile phone type of recovery period, i.e. 2 years. Still outrageous.

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  3. Blair Donaldson

    logged in via Twitter

    "Ignorance or disingenuity?"

    Both. As a fan of podcasts on matters relating to skepticism, I have heard hundreds of similar cases in recent years. A mix of ignorance, deception, opportunity and misrepresented science can lead to extremely sad outcomes.

    These anti-smart meter groups aren't really motivated by the well-being of individuals, their agenda is more to do with their antiscience, extreme libertarian self-aggrandisement than anything else.

    If nothing else, the amount of nonsense promoted as fact in the media, advertising and in general discourse highlights the parlous state of scientific understanding in the general community.

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    1. Jeremy Johnson

      Engineer

      In reply to Blair Donaldson

      The article above is a bit disingenuous as well:

      First, smart meters transmit continuously, every few seconds, 24/7. Here is a short video so that you can see the pulses with your own eyes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NH2rvHH-kE

      Cell phones, iPads, wi-fi (in your home) are all voluntary and intermittent exposures. Smart meters transmit continuously, even at night, and are currently mandatory for most people.

      Second, tens of thousands of people throughout the country and, indeed, the…

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    2. Chris O'Neill

      Retired Way Before 70

      In reply to Jeremy Johnson

      "There are hundreds of excellent, peer-reviewed studies that show that modulated electro-magnetic radiation damages our DNA, our cells, our fertility and our immune, neurological and endocrine systems: http://emfwise.com/science_details.php";

      Well, no. They show correlations but that's it.

      "Wireless will likely be the smoking or asbestos of our generation."

      Yes, it's a huge conspiracy to cover-up the evidence. There's a huge supply of correlation evidence, but the conspiracy somehow manages to cover-up the causative evidence.

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    3. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Jeremy Johnson

      Jeremy, I don't pretend to be an expert on smart meters but I think Dr Karl raises a valid point when he mentions the fact that smart meters and other devices that use low powered RF are radiating nonionising radiation which at most, excites electrons but otherwise doesn't change matter in any way.

      Testimonials from a single MD aren't really worth the paper they are written on unless the evidence is objectively assessed. Anecdotes are a dime a dozen. I'm aware of another MD who moonlights as an expert on so-called wind turbine syndrome, never mind her evidence is entirely based on anecdotes rather than objective, testable facts.

      At least Dr Karl relies on evidence-based science rather than doleful tales from people who are either ill informed, misguided or driven by some agenda only they seem to understand.

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    4. Jeremy Johnson

      Engineer

      In reply to Blair Donaldson

      Since when did "observation" stop being part of science? Perhaps when one's salary is tied to a certain technology?

      If tens of thousands of people are complaining about the same health effects when smart meters are installed on their homes (independently of each other and without even knowing a smart meter had been installed), then the first thing any scientist or engineer should ask is "what is going on?"

      This is how science and knowledge of our world advances. To call people who are experiencing…

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    5. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Jeremy Johnson

      Jeremy, I don't recall stating that observation was not part of this. You are creating a strawman. In any case, I doubt there are "tens of thousands" of people claiming ill-health due to smart meters. Websites dedicated to promoting non-evidence-based claims aren't all that credible, well, they are about as credible as websites dedicated to UFO abductions and area 51.

      There may be many people who have convinced themselves smart meters are making them ill but that's very different to it being true…

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    6. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Blair Donaldson

      Edit: apologies for the typos above. The first line should be, "I don't recall stating that observation was not part of science."

      Second last sentence should be, "I suspect if there was anything genuine about the claims made by smart meter opponents regarding nonionising radiation, it would have been revealed well before smart meters were even thought of.

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    7. Chris O'Neill

      Retired Way Before 70

      In reply to Blair Donaldson

      "You seem to be forgetting that FM and AM radio and television aren't too far along the spectrum from that used by smart meters, cellphones and other RF equipment."

      And for some unknown reason, no-one ever mentions light. Where do these cranks put the dividing line between "harmful" and "non-harmful" EM radiation?

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    8. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Chris O'Neill

      Chris, good point, I should have added light but I figured most people would realise that.

      "Where do these cranks put the dividing line between "harmful" and "non-harmful" EM radiation"

      I suspect it's somewhere people in polite society don't exhibit publicly :-)

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  4. Simon Arthur

    Reader

    The author states "smart meters worldwide use conventional cell phone networks to transmit their data" under the heading "Facts, please". WRONG. Smart Meters use the ZigBee Smart Energy protocol to communicate not just with the Data Concentrators which relay the information back to the energy retailer, but with each other, with In Home Displays, and other ZigBee Smart Energy devices. Energy retailers require the Smart Meter to transmit data reliably to the Data Concentrators, even if the meter is installed in a metal cabinet, or behind a building, or behind a metal garage door, etc etc. Not only this, but data concentrators are much smaller than your typical Mobile Phone basestation and use many different components for a very different system capability. So not only are your "Facts" wrong, but your premise that this somehow relates to mobile phone usage is extremely uneducated.

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    1. Lisa Hodgson

      Director

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      Thanks for the info Simon, I thought the comparison with mobile phones was odd. This article seemed very short on facts and argument and very long on ad hominem.

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    2. Richard Davis

      Telecommunications Engineer

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      Hey Simon. Your WRONG the systems we have been installing in OZ are by far based on 900Mhz Mobile technology. NO ZIGBEE!

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    3. Richard Davis

      Telecommunications Engineer

      In reply to Richard Davis

      Not forgetting even if it was ZIGBEE the power levels of ZIGBEE are 1000 times lower than Mobile

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    4. Simon Arthur

      Reader

      In reply to Richard Davis

      Richard, I think you'll find this interesting, it's from DPI's information on the Smart Meter Specifications:
      "Smart meters communicate interval data back to DBs over special secure private radio networks. Most use a “mesh radio” service provided by Silverspring."
      http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/smart-meters/publications/reports-and-consultations/lockstep-dpi-ami-pia-report/scope
      Silverspring use a wireless chipset from Ember, this is a ZigBee-based chipset. As I'm working in the industry and have…

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    5. Simon Arthur

      Reader

      In reply to Richard Davis

      Richard, another reference you might be interested in from Silverspring - note the absence of GSM/GPRS:
      http://www.silverspringnet.com/solutions/open-standards.html

      I think what you're referring to in the 900MHz band is a variation on ZigBee - 900MHz has longer range than 2.4GHz, so is preferred by some Smart Meter makers. However the firmware stack is still ZigBee-like, it just can't be ZigBee certified because it's outside of the ZigBee standard.

      Some of the Utilities are using GSM/GPRS…

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    6. Jeremy Johnson

      Engineer

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      I believe this is a Silver Springs Networks access point:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebRHgPob-N8

      If so, then I feel for the family that lives behind the wall. These devices are every few blocks in San Francisco - often right outside homes.

      I agree that there are now many sources of electro-magnetic radiation in our day-to-day environment. But why is it that smart meters have made so many people so sick and angered the public so much?

      Even in Australia: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/smart-meter-shock-forces-family-out/story-fn7x8me2-1226181915461

      If the engineers that work in this field are not open to at least asking the question, then this issue will only get bigger.

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  5. Sean Lamb

    Science Denier

    "Stewart A. Swerdlow has the ability to see energy fields and personal archetypes as well as read DNA sequences and mind-patterns"

    A multi-talented individual then, I don't know why the authors are so keen to stick the knife (metaphorically speaking) into him.

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  6. Dan Smith

    Network Engineer

    "Unlike other pseudoscience, the anti-smart meter movements are not, for the main part, being organised in right wing, fundamentalist or not-well-educated circles. In Marin County, California, a trendy suburb north of San Francisco (and hardly a hotbed of pseudoscience!)"

    Marin County actually is a hotbed of pseudoscience: They have an anti-vax movement that has led to them becoming one of the States' lowest vaccination completion rates (and subsequently, of course, the site of a measles outbreak.) It sounds like the issues you've written about fit a similar pattern of critical thinking deficit: Nature Good, Man-Made Bad, something something Toxins, something something Radiation. As you say, it's not necessarily an education issue, but a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing ...

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    1. Simon Arthur

      Reader

      In reply to Dan Smith

      A little knowledge with misconstrued facts is a much more dangerous thing, especially when posted under the name of University of Newcastle. I don't discount that there are fundamentalists out there who are anti-everything, but the authors seem to be fundamentalists of the other extreme:

      1. Microwave ovens (at least in Australia) come with a warning that you must be at least three meters away when they're operating. This is despite the fact they use heavy microwave shielding to minimise radiation…

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    2. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      "Microwave ovens (at least in Australia) come with a warning that you must be at least three meters away when they're operating."

      Links please? The microwave here, 2yo Sharp has no such warnings.

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    3. Dan Smith

      Network Engineer

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      I would be interested in seeing evidence of the microwave oven warnings stating that 3m is a recommended operating distance. This claim sounds dubious. Microwaves use non-ionizing radiation; if by some freaky circumstance you managed to cop some of it, you'd say "ouch", pull away from it, and end up with a heat burn, same as if you touched your oven. It's not a mini nuclear reactor, and you're in more danger taking a stroll outside without sunscreen.

      The 1kW pool pump motor is your assumption…

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    4. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Dan Smith

      Dan, I have heard of two systems although I don't know much about either. One uses a phone cell technology, the other apparently sends a signal back up the supply line. Are there any other systems you are aware of?

      I don't really care what is used in Australia so long as it is reliable and helps reduce inefficiencies in the network and hopefully, cost to consumers.

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  7. Daryl Deal

    retired

    Hmmm, one aspect missing is that smart meters, have a far higher degree of accuracy, when compared to the much older clock and dial units, which by there very nature, do drift in accuracy, over time after the initial factory bulk bench calibration process.

    Lest we forget, there is another far higher degree of inaccuracy built in the system by meter readers. Human nature tells us, we cannot accurately read and/or draw dial positions for computer based OSC readers, within the time frame allocated…

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  8. Chris O'Neill

    Retired Way Before 70

    It's sad that anti-radio wave crackpots have bought into this issue but the electricity supply businesses where I live have shot themselves in the foot by their high-handed attitude towards consumers, i.e. they install smart meters, make consumers pay for them, but then charge consumers as if they still have the old meters. As ye sow so shall ye reap.

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  9. James Sexton

    Network administrator

    Dear God!! Does the inanity never end here?

    The authors have a section which asks for "Just the Facts"? But, they spew such nonsense that conspiratorial thinking is a "conservative" trait? They wouldn't know a fact if it slapped them in the face.

    They state, "In Marin County, California, a trendy suburb north of San Francisco (and hardly a hotbed of pseudoscience!) ". Clearly, they don't know or have never been to the area of left-wing-nuts. Where do they think that nutritional bs started…

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    1. David Healy

      Retired

      In reply to James Sexton

      Interesting, James. Your observations about the non-health-related aspects of smart meters will set straight anyone who thought the power companies were being altruistic when they installed them.

      In particular, your comment about the proprietary signal-over-power communication methodology caught my attention. This is smart and, from a hardware perspective, not rocket science. The software, however, is another ball game. I'd love to know how they did it.

      Did anyone else click the link about…

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    2. James Sexton

      Network administrator

      In reply to David Healy

      Right, power companies rarely do things simply to be nice. It's pretty complicated moving the signal to the software. Lots of circuit boards.

      The concepts used to sell smart metering can easily be seen as beneficial. But, there seems to be little regard to towards some of the other issues. Because we can do it, we should.... seems to be the the thinking.

      The biggest reason why not, IMO, other than the obvious privacy issues, is that there will never be an economic payback. As I stated earlier, this will necessitate constant investment.

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  10. nik dow

    logged in via Twitter

    Smart meters could be interesting if the information was made available to devices drawing power, so that discretionary power consumption could be controlled to avoid high-demand high-price periods.

    Devices would need to be upgraded so that e.g. the dishwasher or washing machine would wait until prices dropped sufficiently before starting its cycle.

    Ultimately the grid might be able to do more than just send price signals, there could be a need to force reductions in consumption as part of…

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    1. Simon Arthur

      Reader

      In reply to nik dow

      Nik, you have made some very interesting comments that the industry is struggling with. The hidden truth is that today's power networks are not able to react fast enough to sudden changes in grid loads utilising Smart Meter data - yet. It takes too long for data to be collected, analysed, and 'hot spots' identified to be able to change either the amount of power from the power station, or to reduce the loads at the user's end. If you think about it, how does all the data from all over Victoria…

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    2. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      "The hidden truth is that today's power networks are not able to react fast enough to sudden changes in grid loads utilising Smart Meter data - yet. It takes too long for data to be collected, analysed, and 'hot spots' identified to be able to change either the amount of power from the power station, or to reduce the loads at the user's end."

      You have evidence to support this claim I suppose?

      How then does the network monitor and address changing demand now? Guesswork? The logical conclusion of your claim is that smart meters can only improve supply/demand issues if the system is currently meeting the demand the vast majority of the time.

      If I was a conspiracy theorist, I've been wondering what your agenda really was.

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    3. nik dow

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      thanks Simon, very interesting. I hadn't thought about information going in that direction. I didn't explain very well, but what I was thinking about was that each 15 minutes the wholesale price is set, and this information could be broadcast out to all the smart meters, and then the consuming devices would use this information to modify their behaviour.

      That makes me realise that the prediction of demand would then get harder, the more responsive the devices were.

      I was also thinking that the grid might tell the meters to limit consumption to a certain limit, if there was not enough power available, and this would be an alternative to black-outs. It would then be up to the customer to decide which things to switch off, for example you might set up an ordered listing of devices so that the least essential are turned off first.

      Consumers with life-support needs would be registered and their limit would never be set too low.

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    4. James Sexton

      Network administrator

      In reply to nik dow

      Why would one wish to limit the peak when one can simply generate more electricity?

      Limiting peak demand on any scale only does one of two things. It either limits activity, or delays activity and consumes time. Both actions limit economic behavior.

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    5. Simon Arthur

      Reader

      In reply to Blair Donaldson

      Blair, the only agenda I have is that the authors didn't use proper facts, they tried to hide behind other technologies which aren't as closely related to Smart Meters as they imply.

      This is a good summary of some of the research being undertaken around Australia:
      http://smartgridaustralia.com.au/SGA/Documents/R&D_Publications.pdf

      So how do power companies cater for demand/reaponse? Actually they haven't changed this much, they use an average profile of power requirements over a 24-hour period, and add an overhead onto this to cater for surges in demand. The Smart Grid can potentially help this situation by allowing them to reduce this overhead, and that is the crux of the research.

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    6. Simon Arthur

      Reader

      In reply to nik dow

      nik, we're getting off-topic here, but you might be interested in this:
      https://theconversation.edu.au/the-internet-of-things-this-is-where-were-going-3965

      The basic concept is that every electronic device will have it's own network address (IPv6), everything from your car to your door lock to your lights (yes, each individual light!) to even your toaster. How this impacts our daily lives is yet to be seen, but one application could be for power control. In fact there's already one company doing this for lighting control, and Swinburne Uni is using it in their research:
      http://www.greenwavereality.com/solutions/led-lighting/
      http://www.swinburne.edu.au/chancellery/mediacentre/hawthorn/news/2011/06/energy-management-partnership-announced

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    7. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Simon Arthur

      Simon, the article is about alleged health issues pertaining to smart meters not the assorted problems with our electricity network. As best I can tell, nobody is denying there are problems with the network that need to be addressed.

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    8. Richard Davis

      Telecommunications Engineer

      In reply to Blair Donaldson

      Simon is using the same old stuff to obfuscate the argument. Ignore the Troll.

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  11. Tim Scanlon

    Debunker

    Given Alex Jones' track record on just about everything you can quickly come to a conclusion: if Alex Jones says it is true, then it is likely that there is nothing to fear what-so-ever, except the fear of your brain dribbling out of your ear from having listened to Alex Jones for more than a second.

    Wasn't there the same paranoia about radio transmissions back when that first became popular? Either way, this is just another example of science being big and scary to people.

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    1. Blair Donaldson

      logged in via Twitter

      In reply to Gavin Moodie

      Gavin, that is most likely what will happen. Generators will have a more accurate picture of supply and demand and consumers will have the option to use electricity at cheaper rates in off-peak periods.

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  12. Bob Bichen

    logged in via Facebook

    It was only a matter of time that the pro-"smart" meter industry shills had to resort to the canard of anti-semitism because they know they're trying to sell a useless, non-green, toxic waste of money. There are thousands of peer-reviewed studies showing harm from chronic low-level microwave radiation, and as Dr. Daniel Hirsch, nuclear scientist, has shown, a smart meter exposes you to approximately 100 times the exposure of typical cell phone use. But keep up the anti-semitism comments, it just makes you look even more ignorant and unscientific in your baseless claims that "smart" meters are safe or have any use at all to the consumer.

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  13. Bob Bichen

    logged in via Facebook

    What kind of idiot needs a "smart" meter to tell him that when he turns off a 100 watt light bulb, he's saving 100 watts of energy usage? Seriously, the idiocy here is just painful. Why would anybody want to subject themselves to 10,000 to 190,000 pulsed microwave transmissions per day (see Santa Cruz court sworn testimony) for absolutely no benefit whatsoever? "Smart" meters only benefit the utilities and the manufacturers of these cheap plastic made in China crap meters that have caused adverse…

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  14. Ian Redfern

    interviewer

    In November last year, I moved into a brand new 6 star energy efficient flat in the Melb inner city area. I'd been living in a renovated former orphanage which had serious negative "atmospheric" problems for some years until about 18 months prior to moving. When I moved into the new place, I started feeling really fatigued at night, and keep waking up early in the morning and finding it difficult to get back to sleep.

    I thought the problem might be residual toxins from the construction, but…

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    1. Chris O'Neill

      Retired Way Before 70

      In reply to Ian Redfern

      "These meters transmit in two bandwidths – 900 and 915 megahertz. And it is transmitted from the meter omni directionally, meaning that our homes are constantly being bombarded with these Electro Magnetic Frequencies (EMF’s) 24 hours a day."

      Like mobile phones.

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  15. Comment removed by moderator.

  16. Sofia Telemzouguer

    logged in via Facebook

    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.

    Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher (1788 – 1860)

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  17. Sofia Telemzouguer

    logged in via Facebook

    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.


    Arthur Schopenhauer, German philosopher (1788 – 1860)

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